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Archives by Tag 'Egypt'
Hated in Egypt
RAMZY BAROUD
When I left Gaza for the first time on my own, twenty some years ago, I was warned of a notorious officer who headed Egypt’s State Security Intelligence at the Rafah border. He “hates Palestinians,” I was told. My friends and neighbors in Gaza warned me not t...
Immutable Egypt
NICOLA NASSER
Gaza will remain a matter of national security for Egypt. And regardless of who is in charge in Gaza, Egypt will also remain a strategic asset for Gaza, a lifeline for its people, and a mainstay of its peace and stability. These are the irreversible facts o...
The Grand Scam: Spinning Egypt’s Military Coup
ESAM AL-AMIN
Every coup d’état in history begins with a military General announcing the overthrow and arrest of the country’s leader, the suspension of the constitution, and the dissolution of the legislature. If people resist, it turns bloody. Egypt is no exception. ...
A Continuing Revolution and a ‘Civil Society Coup’
BRITA ROSE
Since April 2013 the Egyptian opposition group,”Tamarod” (rebellion), had been planning peaceful demonstrations to oust their de-legitimized leader, though discontent had been brewing for more than a year under Morsi rule. What transpired in just four days may...
Requiem for a Revolution that Never Was
AJAMU BARAKA
“Sometimes people hold a core belief that is very strong. When they are presented with evidence that works against that belief, the new evidence cannot be accepted. It would create a feeling that is extremely uncomfortable, called cognitive dissonance. An...
On Those Protest Numbers in Egypt
JACK BROWN
Estimates of how many people demonstrated against Mohamed Morsi in Egypt at the end of June have varied by tens of millions of people. Is it really so hard to quantify such gigantic masses of human beings? The numbers are important because the size of the demonstrations w...
Winning the Rank and File Soldiers in Egypt
CARLOS BORRERO
The Western media has focused considerable attention on the semantic debate over whether or not the toppling of Mohamed Morsi must be called a coup d’état. This is more a reflection of the public relations dilemma faced by the Obama administration than any real concern...
The Grand Dilemma
URI AVNERY
Perhaps you are facing the same moral dilemma as I am: What to think about Syria? What to think about Egypt? Let’s take Syria first. When it started, the choice for me was clear. There was this evil dictator, whose family had mistreated t...
What’s Next For the Egyptian Revolution
SHAMUS COOKE
Egyptians are making history at a frantic pace. After the largest protests in Egypt’s history initiated the downfall of the first Muslim Brotherhood government, a military-led massacre of Muslim Brotherhood faithful quickly altered the political dynamic. Everyth...
The Coup in Egypt
PAUL GOTTINGER
Abdullah Al-Arian is assistant professor at Wayne State University. His research interests include Islamic social movements, globalization and the Muslim world, and United States policy toward the Middle East. His writing has appeared in Foreign Policy and Al Jazeera...
Fomenting Civil War in Egypt
ERIC DRAITSER
The killing of more than 50 peopleat a demonstration in support of oust...
Egypt at the Crossroads
CARLOS BORRERO
Egyptian society finds itself at a crossroads. The violence unleashed in recent days appears to be just the beginning and the repercussions for the entire region are apparent to all. To better understand what is currently happening it is important to place the poli...
How Egypt’s ‘Revolution’ Betrayed Itself
RAMZY BAROUD
“The revolution is dead. Long live the revolution,” wrote Eric Walberg, a Middle East political expert and author, shortly after the Egyptian military overthrew the country’s democratically elected President Mohammed Morsi on July 3. But more accurately, the ...
Three Cheers For Coup Democracy
JOHN GRANT
It was a typical US government response to favorable facts-on-the-ground rooted in violence. Once the military coup in Egypt had been accomplished and the first democratically-elected president of Egypt and many of his allies had been arrested and all sympathetic radio st...
Class Warfare in Egypt
SEAN F. McMAHON
Cairo. Egypt is at war. More accurately, Egypt is experiencing yet another battle in its ongoing class war. The battle is so fierce because the primary combatants are the two most powerful social forces i...
How Egypt Killed Political Islam
SHAMUS COOKE
The rebirth of the Egyptian revolution ushered in the death of the first Muslim Brotherhood government. But some near-sighted analysts limit the events of Egypt to a military coup. Yes, the military is desperately trying to stay relevant — given the enormous initiat...
In Egypt the Military is Supreme
ESAM AL-AMIN
The Generals have done it again! Egypt’s president, Mohamed Morsi, was deposed one year after being democratically elected by the Egyptian people. For those opposed to Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood (MB), the move by the military is seen as supporting a popular...
The Brotherhood Has Failed
URI AVNERY
Let me come back to the story about Zhou Enlai, the Chinese Communist leader. When asked what he thought about the French Revolution, he famously answered: “It’s too early to say.” This was considered a typical piece of ancient Chinese wisdom – until somebo...
Transcending Sectarian Differences
NORMAN POLLACK
Navigating through the recent events in Egypt requires more factual material (the specifics of Morsi’s record) and more intelligence (than I possess) to evaluate what is happening from a broad theoretical perspective about the nature and meaning of democratic processes ...
The Implications of the Egyptian Military Coup
BINOY KAMPMARK
Military coups are no reason to celebrate. They derail the very idea of democratic institutions and sentiment. And it so happens that democracy gave Egypt the now deposed President Mohamed Morsi, an option that his opponents found contentious. The Egyptian military, in it...
Egyptian Military: a State Within a State
BARRY LANDO
In ousting Egypt’s first freely elected president, Mohammed Morsi, the Egyptian military have certainly not acted to preserve democracy. They’ve never shown much interest in that. They’re determined to put a break on the mounting political and economic chaos that is...
Turning Up the Heat in Egypt
CARL FINAMORE
The incredibly massive June 30 protests of millions in dozens of cities across Egypt exceeded expectations of supporters and adversaries alike. The protest demands were “to withdraw confidence in President Mohamed Morsi, to uphold the goals of the revolution and to call...
Is the US Playing With Gas in Syria?
EVAN TAYLOR
Istanbul is rioting, Syria is enflamed, and the Palestinians still do not have a state, but it may be that the real catalyst for action in the Mediterranean is coming from miles under the sea.  Based on discoveries made in the last five years, Israel, Cyprus, and other s...
The West Reserves the Right to Interfere
RAMZY BAROUD
The distance between Cairo’s Tahrir Square and Istanbul’s Taksim Square is impossibly long. There can be no roadmap sufficient enough to use the popular experience of the first in order to explicate the circumstances that lead to the other. Many have tried to i...
Egypt’s Fateful Day
ESAM AL-AMIN
Egypt is imploding. The old revolutionary groups are at each other’s throats. The unity of purpose displayed during the incredible eighteen revolutionary days in early 2011 is not only long gone, but it has been replaced with mistrust, acrimony, and hostility. Al...