Kissingerian Realpolitik

by NILANTHA ILANGAMUWA

Mr. Henry Kissinger , a man who is responsible for the millions of lives and assassination plots against several statesmen across the globe has sent advise from his retirement bed, about what to do and how to deal with the crisis that erupted in Ukraine over Crimea. The deadly crisis has claimed hundreds of lives so far, and caused hundred thousand refugees.

Writing to the Washington Post, last week, once again Kissingerian realpolitik tried to play around the US foreign policy which is based on intervention and destruction for profit making while keeping democracy as the pretext.

“Foreign policy is the art of establishing priorities,” he argued. Kissingerian priorities are none other than plundering the sovereignty of nation and steeling their security while proffering the carrot of liberty. In the end neither liberty nor security will exist in the country. As in order to succeed with this well-planned strategy shadow leaders will become demons of democracy while continually having inside deals with the U.S. government.

We do not have to dig deep into history to understand this reality. The examples of Saddam Hussain, who was executed after a sham trial and the case of Muammar Gaddafi, who killed after surrendering in broad daylight, have given enough factual reality to understand the painful truth.

The Kissingerian “establishing priorities” prevails on the real experiences of history rather than a presumptuous lesson which will only guide you to nowhere. Evidences of Kissinger’s “priorities” are to be seen all around the world, and many skulls still remained under the earth, while screaming for justice, and revenge.

Perhaps, the colour of Kissinger’s recent argument is a bit different and his theory is articulated against his long-rooted enemy which prevailed under the mask of the cold war.

However, his argument has given twilight to the Obama administration, rather than what the honourable lady who served as the same position years later under the Bush Jr. administration did.

Writing to the same paper, Ms. Condoleezza Rice[2] urged the U.S. to lead the crisis and manage the chaotic situation in Ukraine. True, as she says, “This is not 1968, and Russia is not the Soviet Union,” otherwise Mr. Edward Snowdon would never have made his journey to there and started exposing the truth of his motherland. That does not mean it will be a last milepost of that heroic gentleman who left behind all comforts and started the real struggle against the real enemy. Apparently he will never be nominated for a Nobel Prize, which one of the good talkers of our time: Mr. Barack Hussain Obama received unearned. The luck of the lottery is, most of the time, based on hypocritical political power and desires.

“The events in Ukraine should be a wake-up call to those on both sides of the aisle who believe that the United States should eschew the responsibilities of leadership. If it is not heeded, dictators and extremists across the globe will be emboldened. And we will pay a price as our interests and our values are trampled in their wake,” the author of “No Higher Honour”, the book described and attempts to justify what has happened in the name of the War on Terror, has noted.

Despite of all secrets of dominance, the visible result of the “responsibilities of leadership” was shown to the world, when a former refugees’ shelter turned into a prison of the terror suspects, at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba.

The argument that she tried to put forward is none other than the part of same song that she sang over the years, while millions of innocents sacrificed their lives for fake liberation.

The crisis in Ukraine, or in actual term, the Russian intervention of Crimea, prevails in this real notion. However, it does not mean that Mr. President Putin is trying to undermine what the people in general require. They need freedom to live. Certainly they should side neither with the U.S. nor Russia, but, historically, they do have genetic and cultural combinations with the Russians. Apparently, undeniable historical facts remain in the region which screaming for this unity. Once in the series of battles, then due to famine, millions of people in their past generation vanquished. Perhaps they deserved nothing but bitterness of the tyrants and the traumatic memories of Gulags.

We have passed some of the dirtiest chapters of mankind. Perhaps we are heading towards further inhuman treatments in many places such as Syria and Palestine. All these crises have a common tune and play the role of what the outsider needs rather than the needs of the people who are there. That is an open secret. Like Mr. Kissinger’s famous political cohabitation with the Pakistan military dictator, Yahya Khan, who was responsible for killing of millions of people in Bangladesh in what was then, East Pakistan. The U.S. helped military Dictator Yahya Khan, who earned the gratitude of both U.S. and China by making possible a secret visit by Henry Kissinger to Beijing in 1971 for talks with Mao and his associates. The crimes that occurred in Bangladesh shed more blood than Bosnia and to some extent it is comparable with what happened in Rwanda. What we are seeing is that, instead of helping people to win and keep their personal liberty, the U.S. instead engaged with the ruling parties and helped them to corrupt the criminal justice system.

Regime change is an idea to restore democracy where autocracy is in power. In recent history it has taken the form of direct military interventions, colour revolutions, and the famously named Arab Spring. But they deliberately ignored the situation of Arab Autumn period, and it led to more chaos than before.

In the beginning the popular media pushed us to understand this as a healthy exercise, but in many of those nations whose regimes have changed there are more tense and tumultuous circumstances now than in the past. Perhaps the best example is Libya where the former leader was killed in cold blood. It was a war crime in broad daylight. The situations in many countries are similarly worse than before. The idea of regime change and the restoration of democracy has become a tool of destruction.

When I asked, from Colonel (Rtd.) Lawrence Wilkerson,[3] who served as chief of staff to the former Secretary of State, Gen. (Rtd) Colin Power, why does U.S. foreign policy remain unchanged and what might cause a policy change? His simple answer was, “The objective of regime change is just that: regime change. As you say, with the US the objective is usually changing a dictatorship to a more democratic form of government. In my view, the US has no business engaging in such strategies. The US should encourage such changes through the force of its own democratic example, not through force of arms or covert actions to encourage coups d’etatas today it is doing in Venezuela. And, by the way, that US example has been tarnished enormously by such actions as torture and abuse.”

The other side of the Crimean crisis is presented by Liz Wahl[4] which gave rise to her unpleasant resignation. In spite of her employer, Liz Wahl, is letting everybody understand the cruelty of the disguised evils. It was a deliberately ‘attack’ rather than the expression of a couple of lies. Yet, as Rice said, cooking her piece in the Washington Post, “this is not 1968, and Russia is not the Soviet Union.” In these circumstances, most of cooperative media try to enlighten us, on their sincere ignorance. Those who opened up, realize their view point on most things is not the panacea but the knock to lid of Pandora’s Box.

Nilantha Ilangamuwa edits the Sri Lanka Guardian, an online daily newspaper, and he also an editor of the Torture: Asian and Global Perspectives, bi-monthly print magazine. He is the author of the just released non-fictions, “Nagna Balaya” (The Naked Power), in Sinhalese and “The Conflation”, in English.  He can be reached at ilangamuwa@gmail.com

Nilantha Ilangamuwa is Editor of Torture: Asian and Global Perspectives. He also edits the Sri Lanka Guardian, an online daily newspaper. He is the author of the recently released non-fiction books, “Nagna Balaya” (The Naked Power), published in Sinhalese, and “The Conflation”, published in English. 

Like What You’ve Read? Support CounterPunch
September 03, 2015
Sal Rodriguez
How California Prison Hunger Strikes Sparked Solitary Confinement Reforms
Lawrence Ware
Leave Michael Vick Alone: the Racism and Misogyny of Football Fans
Dave Lindorff
Is Obama the Worst President Ever?
Vijay Prashad
The Return of Social Democracy?
Jeralynn Bluford
Quantitative Easing for People: Jeremy Corbyn’s Radical Proposal
Paul Craig Roberts
The Rise of the Inhumanes: Barron, Bybee, Yoo and Bradford
Lynn Holland
For the Love of Water: El Salvador’s Mining Ban
Geoff Dutton
Time for Some Anger Management
Jack Rasmus
The New Colonialism: Greece and Ukraine
Norman Pollack
American Jews and the Iran Accord: The Politics of Fear
John Grant
Sorting Through the Bullshit in America
David Macaray
The Unbearable Lightness of Treaties
Chad Nelson
Lessig Uses a Scalpel Where a Machete is Needed
September 02, 2015
Paul Street
Strange Words From St. Bernard and the Sandernistas
Jose Martinez
Houston, We Have a Problem: False Equivalencies on Police Violence
Henry Giroux
Global Capitalism and the Culture of Mad Violence
Ajamu Baraka
Making Black Lives Matter in Riohacha, Colombia
William Edstrom
Wall Street and the Military are Draining Americans High and Dry
David Altheide
The Media Syndrome Between a Glock and a GoPro
Yves Engler
Canada vs. Africa
Ron Jacobs
The League of Empire
Andrew Smolski
Democracy and Privatization in Neoliberal Mexico
Stephen Lendman
Gaza: a Socioeconomic Dead Zone
Norman Pollack
Obama, Flim-Flam Artist: Alaska Offshore Drilling
Binoy Kampmark
Australian Border Force Gore
Ruth Fowler
Ask Not: Lost in the Crowd with Amanda Palmer
Kim Nicolini
Remembering Wes Craven’s The Hills Have Eyes
September 01, 2015
Mike Whitney
Return to Crisis: Things Keep Getting Worse
Michael Schwalbe
The Moral Hazards of Capitalism
Eric Mann
Inside the Civil Rights Movement: a Conversation With Julian Bond
Pam Martens
How Wall Street Parasites Have Devoured Their Hosts, Your Retirement Plan and the U.S. Economy
Jonathan Latham
Growing Doubt: a Scientist’s Experience of GMOs
Fran Shor
Occupy Wall Street and the Sanders Campaign: a Case of Historical Amnesia?
Joe Paff
The Big Trees: Cockburn, Marx and Shostakovich
Randy Blazak
University Administrators Allow Fraternities to Turn Colleges Into Rape Factories
Robert Hunziker
The IPCC Caught in a Pressure Cooker
George Wuerthner
Myths of the Anthropocene Boosters: Truthout’s Misguided Attack on Wilderness and National Park Ideals
Robert Koehler
Sending Your Children Off to Safe Spaces in College
Jesse Jackson
Season of the Insurgents: From Trump to Sanders
August 31, 2015
Michael Hudson
Whitewashing the IMF’s Destructive Role in Greece
Conn Hallinan
Europe’s New Barbarians
Lawrence Ware
George Bush (Still) Doesn’t Care About Black People
Joseph Natoli
Plutocracy, Gentrification and Racial Violence
Franklin Spinney
One Presidential Debate You Won’t Hear: Why It is Time to Adopt a Sensible Grand Strategy
Dave Lindorff
What’s Wrong with Police in America