A Better Alternative to Extreme Sentencing in Michigan


Imagine you hear gunshots down the street and you call the police, but they take an hour to show up. Imagine the victim is your son, and you don’t call the ambulance because you know it isn’t coming, so you drive to the hospital yourself. These are real stories from Detroit, a city so broke it can’t afford to keep its street lamps lit.

Now imagine that your state is wasting over a billion dollars a year on a policy that’s not making your streets any safer. That’s actually happening in Michigan. Rather than spending that money on more police, more ambulances, or working street lights, the state spends its resources adding years of extra time to prison sentences — extra years that haven’t been shown to have any public safety benefit.

The irony of this waste is nowhere more bitter than in Detroit, once a gleaming jewel of industrial progress, now the largest city in U.S. history to file for bankruptcy. There is no doubt this bankruptcy will cause Detroit’s municipal services to deteriorate even further.

Meanwhile, the state of Michigan readily coughs up about half of a billion dollars a year to house the thousands of prisoners from Wayne County – far more than from any other county in the state. This is allegedly the price of protecting public safety.

And yet, there is no indication that Michigan’s sentencing practices, which are wildly out of step with the rest of the country, have improved peoples’ lives. Michigan prisoners serve more time in prison per conviction than those in any other state: 4.3 years behind bars, almost 50% more than the national average of 2.9 years. Though some might argue that this is somehow due to high rates of violent crime, in fact Michigan’s sentences are among the nation’s longest for every type of crime. State prisoners end up serving by far the most time for violent crimes, and come in 2nd and 4th in the country when it comes to drug and property crimes, respectively.

These extra years of incarceration are not doing much to keep communities safe. We know from research that sentence severity has little or no effect on the level of crime in society. It also has little effect on the recidivism, or re-offense, rates of those who are incarcerated; a national study in 2002 found that recidivism rates for those who served 60 months in prison was nearly the same as it was for those serving only seven months. A review of 50 years of studies found a higher rate of recidivism associated with longer sentences. This shouldn’t be surprising—the longer the sentence, the more a prisoner is institutionalized, the less contact he or she has with social supports outside of prison, and the further removed he or she will be from employment when released.

In other words, Michigan’s massive over-investment in extreme sentencing for Wayne county citizens is doing little to preserve healthy, safe communities in Detroit, while it is doing a lot to strain financial resources and saddle people convicted of crimes with excess years of destructive incarceration.

The money wasted on unnecessarily long sentences could be better spent on things that Detroit’s neighborhoods desperately need. There are 42,900 people in Michigan state prisons. Each of them costs the state $2,343 each month. If state prisoners simply served the national average of 35 months instead of 52 months, the state would save $1.7 billion per year. Even a fraction of that money could make a world of difference if invested in the communities struggling to hold themselves together. That money could clean up damaged neighborhoods, promote business investment, and restore confidence in emergency services. If given the option, how would you spend it?

Chloe Cockburn is an advocacy and policy counsel at the ACLU.

Alex Stamm is a paralegal at the ACLU. 


October 07, 2015
Nancy Scheper-Hughes
Witness to a Troubled Saint-Making: Junipero Serra and the Theology of Failure
Luciana Bohne
The Double-Speak of American Civilian Humanitarianism
Joyce Nelson
TPP: Big Pharma’s Big Deal
Jonathan Cook
Israel Lights the Touchpaper at Al-Aqsa Again
Joseph Natoli
The Wreckage in Sight We Fail To See
Piero Gleijeses
Jorge Risquet: the Brother I Never Had
Andrew Stewart
Do #BlackLivesMatter to Dunkin’ Donuts?
Rajesh Makwana
#GlobalGoals? The Truth About Poverty and How to Address It
Joan Berezin
Elections 2016: A New Opening or Business as Usual?
Dave Randle
The Man Who Sold Motown to the World
Adam Bartley
“Shameless”: Hillary Clinton, Human Rights and China
Binoy Kampmark
The Killings in Oregon: Business as Usual
Harvey Wasserman
Why Bernie and Hillary Must Address America’s Dying Nuke Reactors
Tom H. Hastings
Unarmed Cops and a Can-do Culture of Nonviolence
October 06, 2015
Vijay Prashad
Afghanistan, the Terrible War: Money for Nothing
Mike Whitney
How Putin will Win in Syria
Paul Street
Yes, There is an Imperialist Ruling Class
Paul Craig Roberts
American Vice
Kathy Kelly
Bombing Hospitals: 22 People Killed by US Airstrike on Doctors Without Borders Hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan
Ron Jacobs
Patti Smith and the Beauty of Memory
David Macaray
Coal Executive Finally Brought Up on Criminal Charges
Norman Pollack
Cold War Rhetoric: The Kept Intelligentsia
Cecil Brown
The Firing This Time: School Shootings and James Baldwin’s Final Message
Roger Annis
The Canadian Election and the Global Climate Crisis
W. T. Whitney
Why is the US Government Persecuting IFCO/Pastors for Peace Humanitarian Organization?
Jesse Jackson
Alabama’s New Jim Crow Far From Subtle
Joe Ramsey
After Umpqua: Does America Have a Gun Problem….or a Dying Capitalist Empire Problem?
Murray Dobbin
Rise Up, Precariat! Cheap Labour is Over
October 05, 2015
Michael Hudson
Parasites in the Body Economic: the Disasters of Neoliberalism
Patrick Cockburn
Why We Should Welcome Russia’s Entry Into Syrian War
Kristine Mattis
GMO Propaganda and the Sociology of Science
Heidi Morrison
Well-Intentioned Islamophobia
Ralph Nader
Monsanto and Its Promoters vs. Freedom of Information
Arturo Desimone
Retro-Colonialism: the Exportation of Austerity as War By Other Means
Robert M. Nelson
Noted Argentine Chemist Warns of Climate Disaster
Matt Peppe
Misrepresentation of the Colombian Conflict
Barbara Dorris
Pope Sympathizes More with Bishops, Less with Victims
Clancy Sigal
I’m Not a Scientologist, But I Wish TV Shrinks Would Just Shut Up
Chris Zinda
Get Outta’ Dodge: the State of the Constitution Down in Dixie
Eileen Applebaum
Family and Medical Leave Insurance, Not Tax Credits, Will Help Families
Pierre-Damien Mvuyekure
“Boxing on Paper” for the Nation of Islam, Black Nationalism, and the Black Athlete: a Review of “The Complete Muhammad Ali” by Ishmael Reed
Lawrence Ware
Michael Vick and the Hypocrisy of NFL Fans
Gary Corseri - Charles Orloski
Poets’ Talk: Pope Francis, Masilo, Marc Beaudin, et. al.
Weekend Edition
October 2-4, 2015
Henry Giroux
Murder, USA: Why Politicians Have Blood on Their Hands
Mike Whitney
Putin’s Lightning War in Syria