Exclusively in the new print issue of CounterPunch
SHOCK AND AWE OVER GAZA — Jonathan Cook reports from the West Bank on How the Media and Human Rights Groups Cover for Israel’s War Crimes; Jeffrey St. Clair on Why Israel is Losing; Nick Alexandrov on Honduras Five Years After the Coup; Joshua Frank on California’s Water Crisis; Ismael Hossein-Zadeh on Finance Capital and Inequality; Kathy Deacon on The Center for the Whole Person; Kim Nicolini on the Aesthetics of Jim Jarmusch. PLUS: Mike Whitney on the Faltering Economic Recovery; Chris Floyd on Being Trapped in a Mad World; and Kristin Kolb on Cancer Without Melodrama.
Archives from June 2013
One Death Among 93,000
PATRICK COCKBURN
Damascus. The second of two mortar bombs killed Ghassan al-Khouly as he stood guard last Thursday at an ancient gate into the Christian quarter of the Old City of Damascus. It exploded right beside him killing him instantly, dark bloodstains and a small he...
Edward J. Snowden and the Exposure of Voyeuristic Fascism
NORMAN POLLACK
One person can make a difference in the affairs of state.  21st century political civilization has become habituated to international relations as the province of mega-units in something akin to an uneasy, disturbed condition of equipoise, in which underlying ...
Wrecking the Welfare State in Secret
DAVID CRONIN
A golden staircase greets guests to De Warande, an exclusive club in central Brussels.  Built in the late eighteenth century, this mansion was acquired in 1907 by François Empain, a banker who helped his royal chum Leopold II loot the Congo.  With its historical associ...
Iranian Elections and American Enemies
TED SNIDER
To the surprise of the Western media, Hassan Rouhani, considered a reformer by the West, and not one of the slate of apparently identical Supreme Leader selected conservatives, has won the Iranian election. So now that Ahmadinejad is gone and a moderate is in office, what...
Duke Study Links Fracking to Water Contamination as EPA Drops Study on Fracking Water Contamination
STEVE HORN
Last week, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) kicked the can down the road on a key study designated to examine the connection between ...
The Prairie Fire That Swept Brazil
LAURA CARLSEN
With a million people demonstrating in the streets of cities throughout Brazil, everyone’s scrambling to understand how a twenty-cent bus fare hike turned into a social revolt. Government officials are the most surprised. President Dilma Rousseff hastily cancelle...
Can Wikileaks Save Snowden?
PAUL GOTTINGER
On Sunday, June 23 Edward Snowden left Hong Kong on a commercial flight to Moscow.  He was thought to be planning to leave Russia for Cuba on Monday, June 24, however Snowden never appeared for his flight. Snowden’s current whereabouts are unknown, but Julian Assange...
When Education is a Business
LAWRENCE S. WITTNER
To what extent is education corrupted when it becomes intertwined with profit-making businesses? This question becomes increasingly relevant as corporations move into key roles at American universities. In late June of this year, New York State Governor Andrew Cuom...
The Limits of US Power
BINOY KAMPMARK
By trying to crush these young whistleblowers with espionage charges, the U.S. government is taking on a generation, and that is a battle it is going to lose. – Julia...
Not What Thomas Jefferson Had in Mind
FRED REED
How does one tell whether one is living in a dictatorship, or almost? The signs need not be so obvious as having a squat little man raving from balconies. Methinks the following indicators serve. In a dictatorship: (1) Sweeping laws are made without reference to th...
Welcome Back “Double Standards,” TV’s Best
THOMAS C. MOUNTAIN
Award winning producer Afshin Rattansi has returned to the airwaves with his cutting edge poli-tricks and comedy program “Double Standards” after a three month hiatus from Press TV. Afshin is one of the young lions of alternative reality, resistance media, genu...
Snowden’s Escape
DAVE LINDORFF
Now that Edward Snowden is safely away out of the clutches of the US police state, at least for now, let’s take a moment to contemplate how this one brave man’s principled confrontation with the Orwellian US government has damaged our national security state. F...
An Age of Democratic Ferment?
NORMAN POLLACK
Egypt, Turkey, Brazil, a slowly awakening realization that the contemporary political-social order, even allowing for specific national differences of history, structure, and population composition, has not been responsive to peoples’ needs and inmost aspirations (which...
Is “Lebanon” the Tea Party Utopia?
JEFF KLEIN
Tensions are very high in Lebanon right now, as the tiny country teeters on the verge of being swept into the of civil war in neighboring Syria.  The fighting across the border – and spilling at times into Lebanon itself — has polarized the already fractious popu...
Crush Your Citizens By Spying on Them
BRIAN CLOUGHLEY
Voutenay sur Cure, France. In some of Shakespeare’s plays there was ambivalence about spying on people, but in one instance there has been an obvious follow-on to modern times, when in Hamlet he has Polonius  demand of his servant Reynaldo that ...
Stasi in the White House
PAUL CRAIG ROBERTS
On June 19, 2013, US President Obama, hoping to raise himself above the developing National Security Agency (NSA) spy scandals, sought to associate himself with two iconic speeches made at the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin. Fifty years ago, President John F. Kennedy p...
How to Answer the Dumb Things Climate Change Skeptics Say
JOSHUA FRANK
If you are like me you probably have encountered a few people that do not believe global warming exists, or if they do, they are not always convinced that humans are contributing to the problem. There are usually a range of issues these skeptics raise in an attempt to cas...
Obama’s Faltering Legacy
DEEPAK TRIPATHI
President Obama’s disputed pronouncement that the Syrian government has used chemical weapons and thus crossed his “red line” is significant in several respects, not least because what follows in Syria and the wider Middle East will determine how the Obama ...
Notes From Ankara
TARIQ ALI
Ankara, Turkey. How it changes. When I was in Istanbul last April the mood was sombre. Even the most ebullient of friends were downcast. The latent hostility to the regime was always present, but the AKP’s hegemony, I was told many times, went deep. Erdo...
Cry, Cry, Cry
DAVE MARSH
Bobby Bland was, in his prime, the most powerful blues shouter of all time, though capable as well of a caressing tenderness. “Turn On Your Lovelight” is what the rock world knows, I guess, but the man’s legacy is also in “Ain’t Nothing You C...
The ISO, Caterpillar and Democratic Accountability
PHAM BINH
I was dismayed to see a spat over Angelina Jolie’s sur...
The Message From the Battle of Qusayr
PATRICK COCKBURN
Damascus. As representatives of 11 countries supporting the Syrian rebels met in Qatar over the weekend pledging to supply them with arms, Syrian military officers in the recaptured town of Qusayr expressed confidence that rebels will never be able to reta...
Lessons for Brazil From South Africa
PATRICK BOND
Durban. Over the last fortnight, Brazil’s two million street protesters in 80 cities supporting the Free Fare Movement have declared how fed up they are with making multiple sacrifices to Brazilian neoliberalism as revitalized by one Sepp Blatter, the Sw...
Rural Definitions: You’re O-U-T!
CAROL MILLER
The squabble over how to define rural diverts us from the real problem: Support for vital rural development programs has been decimated. Maybe it’s time for a new take on an old idea. The emerging fight in Washington over how to define “rural” for some federa...
Global Rescue Plan
DAVID SWANSON
When the wealthy nations of the world meet as the G8 or in any other gathering, it’s interesting to imagine what they would do if they followed the golden rule, valued grandchildren, disliked unnecessary suffering, or wished to outgrow ancient forms of barbarism, or...