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Big Brother and the Banksters

by LINH DINH

At the Wall Street protest, a young woman carried a sign, “REVOLUTION IS FUN,” and I don’t doubt that she was having a great time, because it can be exhilarating to engage in a just and noble fight, and to feel that you are an agent of change, a participant in history even, and not just one of its faceless victims, as is the common lot. So fun, yes, at least for her, and at least up to that moment, until the violence explodes, as nearly always happens in anything approaching a political revolution.

The violence of September 24th, the 8th day of the anti-Wall Street Protest, appears to not have caused severe or permanent injuries, though it was brutal enough, and some outrage has even flared in the mainstream media. Anthony Bologna, a 28-year-veteran of the New York Police Department, has emerged as a clear cut villain. Without provocation, he pepper sprayed two young women in the faces, and for this he should certainly be fired, then locked up, but this commotion has overshadowed, at least momentarily, the real target and meaning of this protest. Though police brutality is never to be taken lightly, Occupy Wall Street is aiming to expose and hold to account goons much more vicious than any garden variety Anthony Bologna. Though they maim and cripple countless households, even entire countries, these bigger thugs are rarely condemned and never indicted. In fact, some are given plush jobs in the US Treasury, if not a Cabinet appointment.

Who am I talking about, exactly? Here is where it gets murky, and all by intention. (Theirs, not mine.) When people say Wall Street, as in Wall Street has ruined this country, and it certainly has, what do they mean, exactly? Though there are those who object to financial speculation of any kind, most people have in mind the biggest banks when they rail against Wall Street. They’re really talking about Citibank, for example, that gargantuan money-laundering house, or Goldman Sachs, the world’s leading swindling outfit. Their criminality is well documented, though hard to untangle, since most of us are fairly clueless about the intricacies of the dismal science, and since financial, white collar crimes aren’t as vivid as, say, a middle-aged cop pepper spraying the eyes of two defenseless young women, then calmly walking away as they collapse and scream.

But consider this: there are those who are defending Bologna even now and think that these “hippie chicks” got what they deserved, just as there were those who saw nothing wrong with cops whacking Rodney King with a baton 56 times, kicking him 6 times, then bragging and joking about it afterwards, and even the sadism of Abu Ghraib was cheered by many Americans, so it often comes down to where you’re coming from, but what kind of bias can blind anyone to the fact that it’s criminal for Stephen Friedman, Chairman of the New York Fed and a former CEO of Goldman Sachs, to give 10 billion dollars of our money to Goldman Sachs? Bad publicity over conflict of interest forced Friedman to resign, but if you really think about it, there was no conflict. The Fed can give money to these monster banks because the Fed is owned by these monster banks. If you grant private banks the monopoly to create money, of course they will shower themselves with cash, year in and year out, and use this unlimited power to buy up all of our politicians.

So protest police brutality, media whoredom or governmental corruption all you want, but if you’re willing to overlook the fact that our money supply is controlled by an elite group of criminal bankers, nothing will change. And don’t hold your breath waiting for “our” Attorney General, Eric Holder, to prosecute any of these banksters. Where is Eric Holder, by the way? Has anyone, in any time zone, seen him lately? In any case, the last thing Holder would want to do is to inconvenience, in any way, his true bosses.

Considering the violent police reaction to protesters marching from Liberty Plaza to Union Square, what would have happened had they gone to the Goldman Sachs Headquarters instead? Surely the foot soldiers of empire would not allow the unruly riff raff to desecrate this tall, dignified temple to computerized and three-piece-suited mugging. Kitty-corner from the site of the pulverized Twin Towers, it’s also a Ground Zero. Live, in real time, this is the epicenter of the destruction of the American economy.

Remember that Smith Barney commercial where a sonorous, no-nonsense elderly gentleman intoned, “We make money the old fashioned way. We earn it”? Yeah, right, as in generating money out of nothing, then lending it at interest? As in laundering bloody cash for pushers of heroin or weapons of mass destruction? Smith Barney was owned by Citigroup, a main player in the Federal Reserve. You can’t say these boffo mofos don’t have a fine, sick sense of humor.

Though the mainstream media have stayed clear of this topic, the truths about the Fed are leaking out all over the web, so Big Brother has a solution. The New York Fed is seeking a vendor to help it monitor online conversations about the Federal Reserve. It wants “an alerting mechanism that automatically sends out reports or notifications based [on] predefined trigger[s].” This cyber spook will “provide sentiment analysis (positive, negative or neutral) around key conversational topics” and “identify and reach out to key bloggers and influencers.” With the Fed all eyes and ears, even this trifling article may appear on its radar, so I will take this opportunity to send out an unequivocal greeting to all of our fine banksters, “Gentlemen, for enslaving hard working people, taking food from children, stealing money from senior citizens and degrading countless communities, may all of you be locked up as soon as possible, then rot in hell into eternity.”

Linh Dinh is the author of two books of stories, five of poems, and a just released novel, Love Like Hate. He’s tracking our deteriorating socialscape through his frequently updated photo blog, State of the Union.

Linh Dinh is the author of two books of stories, five of poems, and a novel, Love Like Hate. He’s tracking our deteriorating socialscape through his frequently updated photo blog, State of the Union.

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