Click amount to donate direct to CounterPunch
  • $25
  • $50
  • $100
  • $500
  • $other
  • use PayPal
Support Our Annual Fund Drive! CounterPunch is entirely supported by our readers. Your donations pay for our small staff, tiny office, writers, designers, techies, bandwidth and servers. We don’t owe anything to advertisers, foundations, one-percenters or political parties. You are our only safety net. Please make a tax-deductible donation today.
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

A Conspiracy to Kill Iraqis?

by RON JACOBS

Checking out the news I came across a news article from AFP describing charges recently filed against four US servicemen who were stationed in Iraq in 2007. The charges included conspiracy to commit premeditated murder, among others. According to the military press release, these four soldiers conspired to kill Iraqi detainees while they were serving in the 1st Battalion, 18th Infantry (Regiment). Besides the fact that this sounds like another attempt by military brass to blame low ranking GIs for their screwup, there is the greater fact that if these men are charged with conspiring to murder Iraqis, then shouldn’t there be some other folks facing the same charge? It’s not like these four GIs went over to Iraq by themselves, set up a prison and decided to kill some of the Iraqis detained there.

No, they were there because the Pentagon sent them there after starting a war and occupation ordered by the White House and certified by Congress. These men and women in Washington knew that their war and occupation would kill Iraqis. In fact, they counted on this fact in the hope that they would achieve their goals of destroying the government of Saddam Hussein and replacing it with one willing to do Washington’s bidding. The fact that they have yet to achieve the latter goal is a big reason why the GIs charged with the aforementioned conspiracy charges were in Iraq in the first place. It is not my place to determine the guilt or innocence of these four men, but I’m pretty certain that if those in Washington and Virginia who planned and funded the war in Iraq were charged with conspiracy to murder Iraqis, there would be no question of their guilt.

When I used to argue against the US war in Vietnam with my father and some of his officer pals, the argument would often turn to the morality of that war. Napalm, Agent Orange, carpet bombing – these constituted premeditated murder in my mind. The officers arrayed against me, being religious men for the most part, would argue that my perception was wrong. The deaths of civilians, they explained, was unintentional and the deaths of combatants was justifiable. Nowadays, we call those unintentional civilian deaths “collateral damage” – refusing even to acknowledge their humanity. Like so many Jesuits arguing for the rightness of killing heathen savages in the New World, the officers would insist that there was a difference between killing in war and killing in other circumstances.

My response was one shared by many people opposed to the war and argued quite convincingly by Howard Zinn in his book Vietnam: The Logic of Withdrawal. That argument goes like this (I paraphrase Zinn here): Since killing civilians is inevitable in modern warfare it cannot be called an accident. Bombers and helicopter pilots don’t necessarily intend to kill civilians, but when they attack villages and crowded city streets they know that civilians will be killed. When soldiers and Marines on the ground cannot tell the difference between a civilian and an insurgent and are told to clear an area, they will kill civilians. This killing may not be deliberate, but it is not an accident. Zinn sums it up with this sentence: “It (this killing) is not part of the war. It is the war.” I don’t know if this line of thinking ever convinced my dad or any of his friends, but it certainly applies to the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. If you doubt this, check out some of the testimony from Iraq and Afghanistan vets on the Iraq Veterans Against the War (IVAW) website.

Once one accepts the argument made by Zinn and a multitude of others, then there is no question that if the soldiers on the ground and in the air are involved in manslaughter and murder (whether they believe they are or not), the those who sent them there to commit these crimes are involved as well. So, whether the four servicemen charged with conspiracy to murder Iraqis are convicted or let off like the men involved in the massacre at Haditha, there can be no real justice until the men and women responsible for them being there are also charged not only for conspiring to kill Iraqis, but also to kill Afghans and Americans.

RON JACOBS is author of The Way the Wind Blew: a history of the Weather Underground, which is just republished by Verso. Jacobs’ essay on Big Bill Broonzy is featured in CounterPunch’s collection on music, art and sex, Serpents in the Garden. His first novel, Short Order Frame Up, is published by Mainstay Press. He can be reached at: rjacobs3625@charter.net

 

 

 

 

 

Ron Jacobs is the author of Daydream Sunset: Sixties Counterculture in the Seventies published by CounterPunch Books. He lives in Vermont. He can be reached at: ronj1955@gmail.com.

More articles by:

2016 Fund Drive
Smart. Fierce. Uncompromised. Support CounterPunch Now!

  • cp-store
  • donate paypal

CounterPunch Magazine

minimag-edit

September 29, 2016
Robert Fisk
The Butcher of Qana: Shimon Peres Was No Peacemaker
James Rose
Politics in the Echo Chamber: How Trump Becomes President
Russell Mokhiber
The Corporate Vice Grip on the Presidential Debates
Daniel Kato
Rethinking the Race over Race: What Clinton Should do Now About ‘Super-Predators’
Peter Certo
Clinton’s Awkward Stumbles on Trade
Fran Shor
Demonizing the Green Party Vote
Rev. William Alberts
Trump’s Road Rage to the White House
Luke O'Brien
Because We Couldn’t Have Sanders, You’ll Get Trump
Michael J. Sainato
How the Payday Loan Industry is Obstructing Reform
Robert Fantina
You Can’t Have War Without Racism
Gregory Barrett
Bad Theater at the United Nations (Starring Kerry, Power, and Obama
James A Haught
The Long, Long Journey to Female Equality
Thomas Knapp
US Military Aid: Thai-ed to Torture
Jack Smith
Must They be Enemies? Russia, Putin and the US
Gilbert Mercier
Clinton vs Trump: Lesser of Two Evils or the Devil You Know
Tom H. Hastings
Manifesting the Worst Old Norms
George Ella Lyon
This Just in From Rancho Politico
September 28, 2016
Eric Draitser
Stop Trump! Stop Clinton!! Stop the Madness (and Let Me Get Off)!
Ted Rall
The Thrilla at Hofstra: How Trump Won the Debate
Robert Fisk
Cliché and Banality at the Debates: Trump and Clinton on the Middle East
Patrick Cockburn
Cracks in the Kingdom: Saudi Arabia Rocked by Financial Strains
Lowell Flanders
Donald Trump, Islamophobia and Immigrants
Shane Burley
Defining the Alt Right and the New American Fascism
Jan Oberg
Ukraine as the Border of NATO Expansion
Ramzy Baroud
Ban Ki-Moon’s Legacy in Palestine: Failure in Words and Deeds
Gareth Porter
How We Could End the Permanent War State
Sam Husseini
Debate Night’s Biggest Lie Was Told by Lester Holt
Laura Carlsen
Ayotzinapa’s Message to the World: Organize!
Binoy Kampmark
The Triumph of Momentum: Re-Electing Jeremy Corbyn
David Macaray
When the Saints Go Marching In
Seth Oelbaum
All Black Lives Will Never Matter for Clinton and Trump
Adam Parsons
Standing in Solidarity for a Humanity Without Borders
Cesar Chelala
The Trump Bubble
September 27, 2016
Louisa Willcox
The Tribal Fight for Nature: From the Grizzly to the Black Snake of the Dakota Pipeline
Paul Street
The Roots are in the System: Charlotte and Beyond
Jeffrey St. Clair
Idiot Winds at Hofstra: Notes on the Not-So-Great Debate
Mark Harris
Clinton, Trump, and the Death of Idealism
Mike Whitney
Putin Ups the Ante: Ceasefire Sabotage Triggers Major Offensive in Aleppo
Anthony DiMaggio
The Debates as Democratic Façade: Voter “Rationality” in American Elections
Binoy Kampmark
Punishing the Punished: the Torments of Chelsea Manning
Paul Buhle
Why “Snowden” is Important (or How Kafka Foresaw the Juggernaut State)
Jack Rasmus
Hillary’s Ghosts
Brian Cloughley
Billions Down the Afghan Drain
Lawrence Davidson
True Believers and the U.S. Election
Matt Peppe
Taking a Knee: Resisting Enforced Patriotism
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail
[i]
[i]
[i]
[i]