FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

John Howard and the Curse of Bush

by BRIAN McKINLAY

As I heard the news of the demise of the Right-wing Coalition in the Polish Elections and its’ replacement by a new regime committed to withdrawal from Iraq, I wondered if the fall of yet another of Bush’s allies was a bad omen for John Howard, whose Australian coalition faces the voters on November 24.

In recent days a spate of catastrophic polls all showing Howard and his conservative allies far behind the resurgent Labor Party, all raise the question: is there a malevolent spirit–one of the ancient Furies perhaps–pursuing all those politician who were foolish enough, or dishonest enough, to follow Bush into Iraq, and is Howard to be the next victim ?

Consider the list: Aznar in Spain; Berlusconi in Italy; and of course, the invincible Tony Blair. All gone. All swept away in each case by a massive loss of popularity. Now the Furies have swept away the odious right-wingers in Poland, who had become so despised by Poles across Europe that their doom was sealed by an army of absentee Polish voters in places as far away as Dublin.

This leaves John Howard as just about the last man standing from that band of warriors who stood with Bush on the eve of Shock and Awe.

Actually most of them have been shocked and awed by their own demise in the days that have followed, as undoubtedly now is John Howard as he faces the polls, a day of judgment that he delayed for as long as possible!

A passionate admirer of Bush from their first meeting, Howard has been engulfed by a perfect firestorm of problems. A disastrous nationwide drought has sent food prices soaring, and put global warming on the electoral agenda. Howard, an old fashioned climate change sceptic, has coped badly with the debate, not helped by the huge crowds who flocked to see the Al Gore film–or Gore himself, who was mobbed by huge crowds on his several visits to Australia. Howard , typically, snubbed Gore and refused to see the film: “An Inconvenient Truth.”

Public opinion in Australia was always against the war in Iraq. Now Howard is talking of withdrawing the Australian troops there to a “safe” place, there to be engaged with “training Iraqi forces”, apparently a safe activity!

In recent days as the debate has turned to the possibility of an attack by Bush/Cheney gang on Iran, Howard has said Australia will have no part in any strike on Iran– a far cry from his once enthusiastic support of the doctrine of pre-emptive strikes against all and sundry, which earned him the derisory nickname of Bush’s “Deputy Sheriff” in the Asian-Pacific region.

Now as the polls approach, Howard is caught in the unpopular position of overseeing a rise in housing interest rates, which conflicts with his stance as one who could protect the voters from such measures. The latest polls put him 16% behind Labor and few believe he can recover.

The politician Bush once dubbed “The Man of Steel” now looks more like the Tin Man in the Wizard of Oz!

So do the Furies claim Bush’s “little Ozzie Mate”, the next victim of “The Curse of the House of Bush.”

BRIAN McKINLAY is a former Teacher and a Historian of the Australian Labor Movement, and has written a number of books on Australian History and Politics.

 

 

 

More articles by:
Weekend Edition
July 29, 2016
Friday - Sunday
Michael Hudson
Obama Said Hillary will Continue His Legacy and Indeed She Will!
Jeffrey St. Clair
She Stoops to Conquer: Notes From the Democratic Convention
Rob Urie
Long Live the Queen of Chaos
Ismael Hossein-Zadeh
Evolution of Capitalism, Escalation of Imperialism
Margot Kidder
My Fellow Americans: We Are Fools
Ralph Nader
Hillary’s Convention Con
Lewis Evans
Executing Children Won’t Save the Tiger or the Rhino
Vijay Prashad
The Iraq War: a Story of Deceit
Chris Odinet
It Wasn’t Just the Baton Rouge Police Who Killed Alton Sterling
Brian Cloughley
Could Trump be Good for Peace?
Patrick Timmons
Racism, Freedom of Expression and the Prohibition of Guns at Universities in Texas
Gary Leupp
The Coming Crisis in U.S.-Turkey Relations
Pepe Escobar
Is War Inevitable in the South China Sea?
Norman Pollack
Clinton Incorruptible: An Ideological Contrivance
Robert Fantina
The Time for Third Parties is Now!
Andre Vltchek
Like Trump, Hitler Also Liked His “Small People”
Serge Halimi
Provoking Russia
David Rovics
The Republicans and Democrats Have Now Switched Places
Andrew Stewart
Countering The Nader Baiter Mythology
Rev. William Alberts
“Law and Order:” Code words for White Lives Matter Most
Ron Jacobs
Something Besides Politics for Summer’s End
David Swanson
It’s Not the Economy, Stupid
Erwan Castel
A Faith that Lifts Barricades: The Ukraine Government Bows and the Ultra-Nationalists are Furious
Steve Horn
Did Industry Ties Lead Democratic Party Platform Committee to Nix Fracking Ban?
Robert Fisk
How to Understand the Beheading of a French Priest
Colin Todhunter
Sugar-Coated Lies: How The Food Lobby Destroys Health In The EU
Franklin Lamb
“Don’t Cry For Us Syria … The Truth is We Shall Never Leave You!”
Caoimhghin Ó Croidheáin
The Artistic Representation of War and Peace, Politics and the Global Crisis
Frederick B. Hudson
Well Fed, Bill?
Harvey Wasserman
NY Times Pushes Nukes While Claiming Renewables Fail to Fight Climate Change
Elliot Sperber
Pseudo-Democracy, Reparations, and Actual Democracy
Uri Avnery
The Orange Man: Trump and the Middle East
Marjorie Cohn
The Content of Trump’s Character
Missy Comley Beattie
Pick Your Poison
Kathleen Wallace
Feel the About Turn
Joseph Grosso
Serving The Grid: Urban Planning in New York
John Repp
Real Cooperation with Nations Is the Best Survival Tactic
Binoy Kampmark
The Scourge of Youth Detention: The Northern Territory, Torture, and Australia’s Detention Disease
Kim Nicolini
Rain the Color Blue with a Little Red In It
Phillip Kim et al.
Open Letter to Bernie Sanders from Former Campaign Staffers
Cesar Chelala
Gang Violence Rages Across Central America
Tom H. Hastings
Africa/America
Robert Koehler
Slavery, War and Presidential Politics
Charles R. Larson
Review: B. George’s “The Death of Rex Ndongo”
July 28, 2016
Paul Street
Politician Speak at the DNC
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail