Exclusively in the new print issue of CounterPunch
HOW MODERN MONEY WORKS — Economist Alan Nasser presents a slashing indictment of the vicious nature of finance capitalism; The Bio-Social Facts of American Capitalism: David Price excavates the racist anthropology of Earnest Hooten and his government allies; Is Zero-Tolerance Policing Worth More Chokehold Deaths? Martha Rosenberg and Robert Wilbur assay the deadly legacy of the Broken Windows theory of criminology; Gaming the White Man’s Money: Louis Proyect offers a short history of tribal casinos; Death by Incarceration: Troy Thomas reports from inside prison on the cruelty of life without parole sentences. Plus: Jeffrey St. Clair on how the murder of Michael Brown got lost in the media coverage; JoAnn Wypijewski on class warfare from Martinsburg to Ferguson; Mike Whitney on the coming stock market crash; Chris Floyd on DC’s Insane Clown Posse; Lee Ballinger on the warped nostalgia for the Alamo; and Nathaniel St. Clair on “Boyhood.”
Dog Soldiers

The Michael Vick / George Bush Thing

by RUSSELL MOKHIBER

Here’s my take on the Michael Vick/George Bush thing.

What is the Michael Vick/George Bush thing, you ask?

Under what rock have you been living?

The big issue in the sports world this week has been Michael Vick-the star quarterback for the Atlanta Falcons.

Vick was indicted last week for dog fighting.

The particulars are not pretty.

They include executing dogs who didn’t perform well in the dog fights.

Execution by hanging, drowning, or just slamming them to the ground.

The media is in an uproar.

Animal rights groups are picketing the NFL demanding that Vick be suspended from pro football.

Far more big radio air time had been spent in the last week on Vick’s alleged killing of dogs than on–you guessed it–than on George Bush’s killing of human beings.

Unlike Vick, Bush has not been indicted.

That’s because the Democratic Party–the party in control of the House of Representatives, the House that could bring the indictment (aka articles of impeachment)–was in on the human killing–actually approved of killing.

Given the rabid, vituperative condemnation of Vick in the media last week, one only could wonder–what about George Bush?

Last week, New York Daily News reporter Jimmy Breslin was in Queens for the funeral of Army soldier Le Ron Wilson, who died at age 18 in Iraq.

Breslin put it this way:

"If Bush did this in Queens, he would be in court on Queens Boulevard on a murder charge."

But no, he’s in the White House.

And the complicit Democrats refuse to bring a charge.

Why?

Why?

Because the Democrats–they like the war thing.

Even now, their leading candidates for President are beating the drums for war in Iran.

Here inside the beltway, there’s a pro-war group that is leading the charge against Iran.

It’s called the Israel Project.

And last week, the Israel Project called on leading Democrats to come out for pressuring the country into a confrontation with Iran.

And guess who obliged?

Hillary Clinton. ("We cannot permit Iran to build or acquire nuclear weapons. We also must not let go unanswered its state sponsorship of terrorism.")

Barack Obama. ("Allowing Iran, a radical theocracy that supports terrorism and openly threatens its neighbors, to acquire nuclear weapons, is a risk we cannot take.")

John Edwards ("Iran’s possession of nuclear weapons could also set off a regional nuclear arms race in one of the unstable regions in the world, which directly threaten US interests. As president, Edwards would take aggressive steps to resolve the situation and to protect the United States and our allies.")

Last week, the Justice Department e-mailed me the indictment against Vick.

But the Democrats refuse to send along the indictment against Bush.

Every once in a while, listeners to the sports radio call in shows will say that the Vick thing is all about race.

White people think it’s about race.

Black people think its about race.

It’s not about race.

It’s about dogs.

And humans.

And killing.

And priorities.

Impeach him.

RUSSELL MOKHIBER is the editor of the Corporate Crime Reporter.