New Orleans is Back … Without Blacks

by NATE MEZMER

Did anybody notice that there was hardly any black people in attendance for the grand re-opening of the New Orleans Superdome on Monday Night Football?

Except for, of course, most of the players on the field, ESPN announcer Mike Tirico, a small section of Bono’s makeshift band and a handful of brown faces in the crowd…

All I saw was white people!

So, where are they? Where are the displaced faces of New Orleans? Are the tickets simply too expensive that most poor blacks in the area can’t afford seats?

As I am simultaneously writing these words and listening to the MNF broadcast, ESPN’s Tony Kornhieser asserts that the Superdome is finally ready to be used for something other than "refugees." So my question to you and Tony is this: Where are all the black people?

If this re-opening of the Superdome is supposed to be some kind of triumphant moment for New Orleans, where are all the black people?

Indeed it appears, that the place where 56 weeks ago black Americans in the thousands were left to starve and struggle for life by our very own government, is celebrating its re-opening without most of those people present!

Maybe they are at home watching the game on TV? Maybe they are rooting for their Saints but with troubled hearts and weary souls? Maybe these TV’s are located in living rooms in cities outside of Louisiana, which housed fleeing "refugees" after the storm? Places like Houston, Texas, where George W. Bush’s mother Barbara espoused during the events following Katrina that the victims seemed "better off" in the Texas shelters!

To add insult to injury, the almost entirely white Superdome crowd was privileged to a special appearance by George W. Bush’s father, George Herbert Walker, whom did the honors of the honorary coin toss. Maybe the current president Bush had better things to do? Maybe he is too cowardly to return to the scene of the crime? Or perhaps he wasn’t invited in fear of a backlash from the sell-out crowd? However, judging from the complexion of the inhabitants on this extravagant Monday Night event, I doubt he would have truly received his just desserts?

In the end, this sold-out crowd and all together sold-out season, is not nearly as special as the announcers from ESPN would lead the viewer to believe. As it appears that most of those ticket holders are not of the same color or class as those that were left to drown in the flood waters of Katrina.

However, should this be a surprise? If, many of these people that lacked the means to escape the category 5 storm which entirely destroyed places such as New Orleans’ lower 9th ward, then how could they be expected to afford such a pricey seat?

Indeed, ESPN, the state of Louisiana and the US government could have used there financial and political resources to ensure the presence of a much more colorful re-opening. However that would entail that the powers that be actually cared about these forgotten people, but this of course is a moot point. Because, as Kanye West once candidly and accurately announced to the world, the representative figure of the people of the United States doesn’t even care about these displaced black people, so why should you?

Are you ready for some football?

NATE MEZMER, is a hip-hop artist and writer that stands for social change, his debut album "Kill the Precedent," was released on Mad Seven Records. He can be reached on the fly at natemezmer@tmail.com.





 

Like What You’ve Read? Support CounterPunch
Weekend Edition
August 28-30, 2015
Jeffrey St. Clair
Long Time Coming, Long Time Gone
Mike Whitney
Looting Made Easy: the $2 Trillion Buyback Binge
Randy Blazak
Donald Trump is the New Face of White Supremacy
Alan Nasser
The Myth of the Middle Class: Have Most Americans Always Been Poor?
Rob Urie
Wall Street and the Cycle of Crises
Andrew Levine
Viva Trump?
Ismael Hossein-Zadeh
Behind the Congressional Disagreements Over the Iran Nuclear Deal
Lawrence Ware – Marcus T. McCullough
I Won’t Say Amen: Three Black Christian Clichés That Must Go
Evan Jones
Zionism in Britain: a Neglected Chronicle
John Wight
Learning About the Migration Crisis From Ancient Rome
Andre Vltchek
Lebanon – What if it Fell?
Charles Pierson
How the US and the WTO Crushed India’s Subsidies for Solar Energy
Robert Fantina
Hillary Clinton, Palestine and the Long View
Ben Burgis
Gore Vidal Was Right: What Best of Enemies Leaves Out
Suzanne Gordon
How Vets May Suffer From McCain’s Latest Captivity
Robert Sandels - Nelson P. Valdés
The Cuban Adjustment Act: the Other Immigration Mess
Uri Avnery
The Molten Three: Israel’s Aborted Strike on Iran
John Stanton
Israel’s JINSA Earns Return on Investment: 190 Americans Admirals and Generals Oppose Iran Deal
Bill Yousman
The Fire This Time: Ta-Nehisi Coates’s “Between the World and Me”
Scott Parkin
Katrina Plus Ten: Climate Justice in Action
Michael Welton
The Conversable World: Finding a Compass in Post-9/11 Times
Brian Cloughley
Don’t be Black in America
Kent Paterson
In Search of the Great New Mexico Chile Pepper in a Post-NAFTA Era
Binoy Kampmark
Live Death on Air: The Killings at WDBJ
Gui Rochat
The Guise of American Democracy
Emma Scully
Vultures Over Puerto Rico: the Financial Implications of Dependency
Chuck Churchill
Is “White Skin Privilege” the Key to Understanding Racism?
Kathleen Wallace
The Id(iots) Emerge
Andrew Stewart
Zionist Hip-Hop: a Critical Look at Matisyahu
Gregg Shotwell
The Fate of the UAW: Study, Aim, Fire
Halyna Mokrushyna
Decentralization Reform in Ukraine
Norman Pollack
World Capitalism, a Basket Case: A Layman’s View
Sarah Lazare
Listening to Iraq
John Laforge
NSP/Xcel Energy Falsified Welding Test Documents on Rad Waste Casks
Wendell G Bradley
Drilling for Wattenberg Oil is Not Profitable
Joy First
Wisconsin Walk for Peace and Justice: Nine Arrested at Volk Field
Mel Gurtov
China’s Insecurity
Mateo Pimentel
An Operator’s Guide to Trump’s Racism
Yves Engler
Harper Conservatives and Abuse of Power
Michael Dickinson
Police Guns of Brixton: Another Unarmed Black Shot by London Cops
Ron Jacobs
Daydream Sunset: a Playlist
Charles R. Larson
The Beginning of the Poppy Wars: Amitav Ghosh’s “Flood of Fire”
David Yearsley
A Rising Star Over a Dark Forest
August 27, 2015
Sam Husseini
Foreign Policy, Sanders-Style: Backing Saudi Intervention
Brad Evans – Henry A. Giroux
Self-Plagiarism and the Politics of Character Assassination: the Case of Zygmunt Bauman