FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

Zarqawi’s War

by PATRICK COCKBURN

Baghdad.

Abu Musab al-Zarqawi is a mysterious figure who has become notorious because of the savage cruelty with which he has treated his kidnap victims.

He heads an increasingly powerful Islamic fundamentalist movement in Iraq but little is known about him: US intelligence admits it does not even know if he has still has both legs, having supposedly had one amputated after being wounded by a US bomb in Afghanistan.

Zarqawi appears to be obsessed with personally participating in the grisly ritual of decapitating his hostages.

He sees anybody who co-operates with the US or the interim government as a potential victim. Islamic clerics who support the resistance but criticise Zarqawi’s methods are savagely denounced and two who were gunned down this week may have died on his orders.

The few people who have met Zarqawi and survived say he has a strong personality. A prison doctor who knew him when he was in jail in Jordan said he could order his followers to do things “just by moving his eyes.”

He calls his followers to battle with bloody thirsty rhetoric. On a tape recording earlier this year he says: “Oh Allah, America came with its horses and knights to challenge Allah and his message. Oh Allah, destroy the kingdom of Bush as you destroyed the kingdom of Caesar.”

He was born Ahmed Fadeel al-Khalayleh, an ethnic Palestinian, 37 years ago. After growing up in poverty in the grim industrial town of Zarqa in Jordan, he went to fight in Afghanistan in the 1980s. On his return to Jordan in 1992 was jailed for six years after guns were found in his house.

On his release Zarqawi returned to Afghanistan and later to Iraq. His name became internationally famous last year, when Colin Powell, the US Secretary State, denounced him before the UN Security Council as a link between al-Qa’ida and Saddam Hussein. No evidence for this was produced.

It was at this time that he is believed to have set up cells of his organisation Tawhid and Jihad (Unity and Holy War) in Iraq.

From February this year, US officials in Baghdad, citing a captured message from him, focussed on Zarqawi as the source of al-Qa’ida involvement in Iraq. This was largely a propaganda ploy. The US had long sought to portray the resistance to the occupation as either supporters of Saddam Hussein or foreign fighters linked to al-Qa’ida. Zarqawi’s name was brought up by US spokesmen at every press conference, as if he were the sole instigator of the guerrilla war.

The denunciations of Zarqawi by the US may, ironically, have helped him recruit men and money outside Iraq, particularly in Saudi Arabia. It also gained him popularity in some Sunni Muslim districts in Iraq. For instance when a US Bradley Fighting Vehicle was destroyed in Haifa Street earlier this month, local teenagers quickly made a black Tawhid flag and stuck it in the muzzle of the gun.

The group has claimed credit for a ruthless bombing campaign as well as the deaths of several hostages. The exact number of its members is unknown, but they may number as many as 1,000. It has disregarded calls by other Iraqi resistance groups to stop killing Iraqi policemen and young men, desperate for employment, queuing up to get jobs in the security services. Any Iraqi co-operating with the occupation in any way is a target.

Most of the Iraqi resistance is home-grown but Zarqawi and Tawhid plays an increasingly important role. At the time of the uprising in Sunni areas around Baghdad in April there were few foreign fighters, despite US claims to the contrary. Since then many foreigners have come to Fallujah, mostly from Saudi Arabia, and they are well-armed and well-financed.

Many Iraqis believe that extent and power of Zarqawi’s movement has been exaggerated by the US to discredit the resistance, though there is no doubt that Tawhid exists and is a growing force. But the savagery of its methods is creating a backlash among the other insurgents who see it as too willing to kill ordinary Iraqis.

ATTACKS ATRTRIBUTED TO ABU MUSAB AL-ZARQAWI

* 2003 Zarqawi is named as the organiser of a series of lethal bombings – from Casablanca in Morocco to Istanbul in Turkey.

* August 2003 Blamed by the US for assassination of the Shia cleric, Ayatollah al-Hakim, at a shrine in the town of Najaf, one of the bloodiest attacks in Iraq last year in which more than 50 Shia worshippers died.

* February 2004 US offers a $25m reward for the capture of Zarqawi (the original bounty on his head was $5m) after intercepting a letter which indicated he was working with al-Qa’ida to drive the US out of Iraq. Within days of the letter’s release, bomb attacks on recruiting centres for the Iraqi security forces had killed nearly 100 people.

* March 2004 Officials say he may have been behind the 11 March Madrid bombings which killed 191.

* May 2004 Zarqawi beheads the US contractor Nick Berg. The murder is broadcast on the internet.

* June 2004 Zarqawi’s group is blamed for a wave of attacks that killed more than 100 people in attacks in five Iraqi cities.

 

More articles by:
Weekend Edition
May 27, 2016
Friday - Sunday
John Pilger
Silencing America as It Prepares for War
Rob Urie
By the Numbers: Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are Fringe Candidates
Paul Street
Feel the Hate
Daniel Raventós - Julie Wark
Basic Income Gathers Steam Across Europe
Andrew Levine
Hillary’s Gun Gambit
Jeffrey St. Clair
Hand Jobs: Heidegger, Hitler and Trump
S. Brian Willson
Remembering All the Deaths From All of Our Wars
Dave Lindorff
With Clinton’s Nixonian Email Scandal Deepening, Sanders Must Demand Answers
Pete Dolack
Millions for the Boss, Cuts for You!
Gunnar Westberg
Close Calls: We Were Much Closer to Nuclear Annihilation Than We Ever Knew
Peter Lee
To Hell and Back: Hiroshima and Nagasaki
Karl Grossman
Long Island as a Nuclear Park
Binoy Kampmark
Sweden’s Assange Problem: The District Court Ruling
Robert Fisk
Why the US Dropped Its Demand That Assad Must Go
Martha Rosenberg – Ronnie Cummins
Bayer and Monsanto: a Marriage Made in Hell
Brian Cloughley
Pivoting to War
Stavros Mavroudeas
Blatant Hypocrisy: the Latest Late-Night Bailout of Greece
Arun Gupta
A War of All Against All
Dan Kovalik
NPR, Yemen & the Downplaying of U.S. War Crimes
Randy Blazak
Thugs, Bullies, and Donald J. Trump: The Perils of Wounded Masculinity
Murray Dobbin
Are We Witnessing the Beginning of the End of Globalization?
Daniel Falcone
Urban Injustice: How Ghettos Happen, an Interview with David Hilfiker
Gloria Jimenez
In Honduras, USAID Was in Bed with Berta Cáceres’ Accused Killers
Kent Paterson
The Old Braceros Fight On
Lawrence Reichard
The Seemingly Endless Indignities of Air Travel: Report from the Losing Side of Class Warfare
Peter Berllios
Bernie and Utopia
Stan Cox – Paul Cox
Indonesia’s Unnatural Mud Disaster Turns Ten
Linda Pentz Gunter
Obama in Hiroshima: Time to Say “Sorry” and “Ban the Bomb”
George Souvlis
How the West Came to Rule: an Interview with Alexander Anievas
Julian Vigo
The Government and Your i-Phone: the Latest Threat to Privacy
Stratos Ramoglou
Why the Greek Economic Crisis Won’t be Ending Anytime Soon
David Price
The 2016 Tour of California: Notes on a Big Pharma Bike Race
Dmitry Mickiewicz
Barbarous Deforestation in Western Ukraine
Rev. William Alberts
The United Methodist Church Up to Its Old Trick: Kicking the Can of Real Inclusion Down the Road
Patrick Bond
Imperialism’s Junior Partners
Mark Hand
The Trouble with Fracking Fiction
Priti Gulati Cox
Broken Green: Two Years of Modi
Marc Levy
Sitrep: Hometown Unwelcomes Vietnam Vets
Lorenzo Raymond
Why Nonviolent Civil Resistance Doesn’t Work (Unless You Have Lots of Bombs)
Ed Kemmick
New Book Full of Amazing Montana Women
Michael Dickinson
Bye Bye Legal High in Backwards Britain
Missy Comley Beattie
Wanted: Daddy or Mommy in Chief
Ed Meek
The Republic of Fear
Charles R. Larson
Russian Women, Then and Now
David Yearsley
Elgar’s Hegemony: the Pomp of Empire
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail