Click amount to donate direct to CounterPunch
  • $25
  • $50
  • $100
  • $500
  • $other
  • use PayPal
Keep CounterPunch ad free. Support our annual fund drive today!

There’s No Place Like CounterPunch

There's no place like CounterPunch, it's just that simple. And as the radical space within the "alternative media"(whatever that means) landscape continues to shrink, sanctuaries such as CounterPunch become all the more crucial for our political, intellectual, and moral survival. Add to that the fact that CounterPunch won't inundate you with ads and corporate propaganda. So it should be clear why CounterPunch needs your support: so it can keep doing what it's been doing for nearly 25 years. As CP Editor, Jeffrey St. Clair, succinctly explained, "We lure you in, and then punch you in the kidneys." Pleasant and true though that may be, the hard-working CP staff is more than just a few grunts greasing the gears of the status quo.

So come on, be a pal, make a tax deductible donation to CounterPunch today to support our annual fund drive, if you have already donated we thank you! If you haven't, do it because you want to. Do it because you know what CounterPunch is worth. Do it because CounterPunch needs you. Every dollar is tax-deductible. (PayPal accepted)

Thank you,
Eric Draitser

Gays Under the Occupation



The police officer shoved the Palestinian into the patrol car. “This time,” he said, “we are going to take care of you; I will personally make sure that you are sent back to where you came from.”

For Fuad Moussa, a 27-year-old gay man who grew up in Ramallah, these words amounted to a death sentence.

Fuad is in imminent danger due to two “crimes”: in Palestine he is persecuted due to his sexual orientation, and in Israel he is persecuted because he chose to live in Jerusalem with his Jewish partner, Ezra, even though he does not have a permit to be in Israel.

The two men met eight years ago, and for the past four have been sharing an apartment in a middleclass Jerusalem neighborhood; they work together in Ezra’s plumbing business. Their life was uneventful until the outbreak of the second Intifada in September 2000, when tens of thousands of Palestinian laborers had their entry permits into Israel revoked. Overnight Fuad’s life turned into a nightmare.

The Israeli police began profiling Palestinians, and on numerous occasions they caught Fuad, detained him and even deported him to the occupied territories.

Even though Fuad cannot stay in Israel according to Israeli law, going back to live in Ramallah is no longer an option; some of his fundamentalist Muslim relatives have stated in unequivocal terms that if he were to return they would kill him. This is their way of coping with the idea that their cousin is a homosexual.

The police, who are well aware of these lethal ramifications, have, nonetheless, refused to change their course of action.

With Ezra’s help, Fuad has managed to survive. Each time he was caught and deported across the border, Ezra would drive to the territories and smuggle him back the same night in the trunk of his car, which attracts little suspicion at checkpoints due to its Israeli license plates.

All this has changed in the past month. For some reason the police have decided to hunt the fugitive down and to put an end to the cat and mouse chase.

Knowing where Ezra and Fuad live, they detained the latter six times in a period of two weeks. Finally, during the last arrest, the police brought him to court at night, and, in a swift legal procedure, a judge ruled that he either be imprisoned or be deported immediately and permanently to Ramallah.

As a result of an appeal that was submitted by Ezra the following morning, the court put Fuad under house arrest for an indeterminate period. While he is confined to their one bedroom apartment, for the time being he is not in danger.

Fuad is surely not the only Palestinian who has a death sentence hanging over his head due to his sexual orientation; there are other young people who constantly have to hide, living in the shadows for fear of being deported from Israel back to the occupied territories.

Fuad Moussa’s life, however, can be saved with some public pressure. With one quick signature, the Israeli Interior Minister Avraham Poraz, a self-proclaimed liberal, can grant Fuad a Jerusalem residency card, which would allow him to legally remain in the city. Israel’s President Moshe Katzav can also ensure that such a card be issued.

Will Fuad spend the rest of his life in the shadows for fear of death, or will the Israeli authorities allow him to live with his partner Ezra? Your letter may help determine this question.

Write immediately — mentioning Fuad Moussa id 851611707 — to:

Interior Minister Avraham Poraz email:,, (send to all three)

or fax +972-2-5666376

President Moshe Katzav email:, (send to both)

fax +972-2-5671314

Please make sure to send copies to: by bccing the emails.

NEVE GORDON teaches politics and human rights at Ben-Gurion University and can be reached at


Neve Gordon is the co-author (with Nicola Perugini) of the newly released The Human Right to Dominate.

More articles by:

2016 Fund Drive
Smart. Fierce. Uncompromised. Support CounterPunch Now!

  • cp-store
  • donate paypal

CounterPunch Magazine


October 25, 2016
David Swanson
Halloween Is Coming, Vladimir Putin Isn’t
Hiroyuki Hamada
Fear Laundering: an Elaborate Psychological Diversion and Bid for Power
Priti Gulati Cox
President Obama: Before the Empire Falls, Free Leonard Peltier and Mumia Abu-Jamal
Kathy Deacon
Plus ça Change: Regime Change 1917-1920
Robin Goodman
Appetite for Destruction: America’s War Against Itself
Richard Moser
On Power, Privilege, and Passage: a Letter to My Nephew
Rev. William Alberts
The Epicenter of the Moral Universe is Our Common Humanity, Not Religion
Dan Bacher
Inspector General says Reclamation Wasted $32.2 Million on Klamath irrigators
David Mattson
A Recipe for Killing: the “Trust Us” Argument of State Grizzly Bear Managers
Derek Royden
The Tragedy in Yemen
Ralph Nader
Breaking Through Power: It’s Easier Than We Think
Norman Pollack
Centrist Fascism: Lurching Forward
Guillermo R. Gil
Cell to Cell Communication: On How to Become Governor of Puerto Rico
Mateo Pimentel
You, Me, and the Trolley Make Three
Cathy Breen
“Today Is One of the Heaviest Days of My Life”
October 24, 2016
John Steppling
The Unwoke: Sleepwalking into the Nightmare
Oscar Ortega
Clinton’s Troubling Silence on the Dakota Access Pipeline
Patrick Cockburn
Aleppo vs. Mosul: Media Biases
John Grant
Humanizing Our Militarized Border
Franklin Lamb
US-led Sanctions Targeting Syria Risk Adjudication as War Crimes
Paul Bentley
There Must Be Some Way Out of Here: the Silence of Dylan
Norman Pollack
Militarism: The Elephant in the Room
Patrick Bosold
Dakota Access Oil Pipeline: Invite CEO to Lunch, Go to Jail
Paul Craig Roberts
Was Russia’s Hesitation in Syria a Strategic Mistake?
David Swanson
Of All the Opinions I’ve Heard on Syria
Weekend Edition
October 21, 2016
Friday - Sunday
John Wight
Hillary Clinton and the Brutal Murder of Gaddafi
Diana Johnstone
Hillary Clinton’s Strategic Ambition in a Nutshell
Jeffrey St. Clair
Roaming Charges: Trump’s Naked and Hillary’s Dead
John W. Whitehead
American Psycho: Sex, Lies and Politics Add Up to a Terrifying Election Season
Stephen Cooper
Hell on Earth in Alabama: Inside Holman Prison
Patrick Cockburn
13 Years of War: Mosul’s Frightening and Uncertain Future
Rob Urie
Name the Dangerous Candidate
Pepe Escobar
The Aleppo / Mosul Riddle
David Rosen
The War on Drugs is a Racket
Sami Siegelbaum
Once More, the Value of the Humanities
Cathy Breen
“Today Is One of the Heaviest Days of My Life”
Neve Gordon
Israel’s Boycott Hypocrisy
Mark Hand
Of Pipelines and Protest Pens: When the Press Loses Its Shield
Victor Wallis
On the Stealing of U.S. Elections
Michael Hudson
The Return of the Repressed Critique of Rentiers: Veblen in the 21st century Rentier Capitalism
Brian Cloughley
Drumbeats of Anti-Russia Confrontation From Washington to London
Howard Lisnoff
Still Licking Our Wounds and Hoping for Change
Brian Gruber
Iraq: There Is No State
Peter Lee
Trump: We Wish the Problem Was Fascism
Stanley L. Cohen
Equality and Justice for All, It Seems, But Palestinians