Exclusively in the new print issue of CounterPunch
THE DECAY OF AMERICAN MEDIA — Patrick L. Smith on the decline and fall of American journalism; Peter Lee on China and its Uyghur problem; Dave┬áMacaray on brain trauma, profits and the NFL; Lee Ballinger on the bloody history of cotton. PLUS: “The Vindication of Love” by JoAnn Wypijewski; “The Age of SurrealPolitick” by Jeffrey St. Clair; “The Radiation Zone” by Kristin Kolb; “Washington’s Enemies List” by Mike Whitney; “The School of Moral Statecraft” by Chris Floyd and “The Surveillance Films of Laura Poitras” by Kim Nicolini.
Archives from August 2003
Post-Sandinista Nicaragua
CAROLE HARPER
Many of us in Sacramento, and in other parts of the U.S., struggled to support the revolution in Nicarauga throughout the 1980’s. I lived in Nicaragua from 1986 to 1990, working with Habitat for Humanity in several rural communities. I was a member of a libe...
Bring Our Troops Home, Now!
CYNTHIA McKINNEY
(Speech to the House of the Lord Church Brooklyn, NY August 19, 2003) Reverend Daughtry, Congregation of The House of the Lord, Councilman Barron-soon to be Mayor Barron-fellow warriors for peace; family members of the US troops stationed abroad. Thank you ...
The Second Anniversary of 9/11
DAVID KRIEGER
As we approach the second anniversary of the terrorist attacks of 9/11, it is important to take a hard look at the direction our country has taken since these tragic events occurred. The United States has attacked Afghanistan and driven the Taliban regime f...
Springsteen’s America
RON JACOBS
Two of my friends had finally scored. They had been standing outside of the Carter Barron Theater in Washington, DC every evening during that July week in 1975 hoping to find somebody willing to let go of a couple tickets to see Bruce Springsteen and the E Street ...
Revisiting the Paranoid Style in the Dark
MICHAEL EGAN
In November 1965, all electric power in an 80,000-square-mile area of the northeastern United States and Canada failed. Like the most recent failure, the breakdown was a total surprise and attributable to a single plant failure. In 1965, the electric grid was supp...
Now No One Is Safe in Iraq
ROBERT FISK
What UN member would ever contemplate sending peace-keeping troops to Iraq now? The men who are attacking America’s occupation army are ruthless, but they are not stupid. They know that President George Bush is getting desperate, that he will do anythingR...
Ashcroft’s VICTORY Laps
ELAINE CASSEL
In an unprecedented, desperate, and politically motivated move, Brother John Ashcroft has taken to the road. Setting up his tent in strategic cities to bring his Traveling Patriot Salvation Show to lost Americans. With apologies to Neil Diamond, "pack up the ...
Sergio Vieira de Mello
MARJORIE COHN
But for George W. Bush’s illegal and misguided war on Iraq, Sergio Vieira de Mello, the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, would be alive today. Mr. de Mello devoted most of his life to the U.N.’s mission to protect human rights and ach...
Bush Owes the Public Some Serious Answers on Iraq
Rep. HENRY WAXMAN
Controversy is growing over President Bush’s use of forged evidence in his State of the Union address. Indeed, the issue is fast becoming a whodunit. Who inserted the fabricated claim that Iraq was seeking uranium from an African country into the statements ...
Why the US Needs to Blame Anyone But Locals for UN Bombing
ROBERT FISK
It was always the same story. If it wasn’t the enemy you were fighting, it was the enemy you knew you’d have to fight in the future. So when the killers of Baghdad on Tuesday slaughtered 20 UN staff, with the UN’s local proconsul, Sergio V...
War Crimes and Punishment in Indonesia
BEN TERRALL
In the wake of the death sentence given to a suspect in last year’s Bali bombing and the recent Jakarta car bombing that killed 10 people, the U.S. mainstream media is again focusing on Islamic fundamentalist terror in Indonesia. But in the rush to speculate...
California’s Blackouts Were the "Wake Up Call"
JASON LEOPOLD
The California energy crisis should have been a warning to the White House. Opening up the electricity sector to competition may eventually provide consumers with cheaper power but it won’t ensure a reliable flow of electricity unless the high-voltage transm...
Life and Death on the Front Lines in Baghdad
CAOIMHE BUTTERLY
in Baghdad Anwar Adel Khardom points to her heavily pregnant, shrapnel-sprayed stomach as she fluctuates between composure and frantic, inconsolable grief: "what sort of life will this child be born into?" Her thirteen year old daughter Hadil, fra...
UN Bombing
KURT NIMMO
Is it a surprise unknown persons have bombed the United Nations building in Baghdad? No, the bombing was inevitable, considering the United Nation’s role in the occupation of Iraq. It is surprising, however, that the bombers were able to so easily drive a ce...
The Imperial Bluster of Tom Delay
EDWARD SAID
During the last days of July, Representative Tom Delay (Republican) of Texas, the House majority leader and described routinely as one of the three or four most powerful men in Washington, delivered himself of his opinions regarding the roadmap and the future of p...
Toward Permanent War
VIRGINIA TILLEY
The terrible bombing of the UN offices in Baghdad has capped an accelerating series of sabotage actions against Iraqi water mains, oil pipelines, electricity grids–and US soldiers, hapless agents of this mess, who are killed daily. But most sharply, it highl...
A Downside Day
JOHN L. HESS
The news from liberated Iraq is godawful. Bombs hitting oil and water pipelines and the compound where the UN was trying to resume its relief work. Nobody has claimed responsibility, so the question arose — qui bono — who benefits from this? An immedia...
NPR and the NAFTA Highway
STEVEN HIGGS
Dear Mr. Inskeep: As a journalist who frequently awakens to the sound of your voice, I was thrilled when ...
Getting Gouged by Banks
CHRISTOPHER BRAUCHLI
The shoe that fits one person pinches another. Carl Jung, Modern Man in Search of a Soul It is easy to forget that next to dogs, banks are man’s best friend even though, from time to time, they bite. That was brought t...
The Case of Mr. Aznar, Friend of Bush
VICENTE NAVARRO
Can you imagine the response of the U.S. media if the president of the governing party of Poland were to say that Stalin was the former Soviet Union’s greatest leader? Or if the president of the German government had never condemned the Hitler regime, or if ...
Building Tomorrow’s House
RAMZI KYSIA
Having spent a year in Iraq, I remain continuously startled by the things I see and feel here. Perhaps I shouldn’t still be surprised by the resilience of these people. Perhaps I shouldn’t still wonder at their ability to absorb incredible amounts of s...
Australia v. the Evil-Doers in the South Pacific
GARY LEUPP
Disorder in the Solomons Few people in the U.S., and probably in the world, are aware that there is a small nation called the Solomon Islands, independent since 1978, east of New Guinea and about a thousand miles northeast of Australia’s state of Quee...
Bush’s Star Wars Credibility Problem
MATT MARTIN
Without fanfare, the Department of Defense has revised and substantially changed the most important missile defense announcement to come out of a US administration in the last decade. In a variety of ways, these revisions effectively lower the bar for what will be...
What Kermit Roosevelt Didn’t Say
SASAN FAYAZMANESH
"’I owe my throne to God, my people, my army and to you!’ By ‘you’ he [the shah] meant me and the two countries-Great Britain and the United States-I was representing. We were all heroes." Countercoup: The Stru...
Colombia Moves Toward Totalitarianism
SEAN DONAHUE
The morning that Alvaro Uribe was inaugurated President of Colombia, Yolanda Becerra, the head of a women’s group in a city controlled by right wing paramilitaries, said that "We expect to see the consolidation of a totalitarian model with the blessing ...