FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

We Come for Peace

by Rep. Cynthia McKinney [Remarks To April 20, Peace Rally In Washington, DC]

[Remarks to April 20, peace rally in Washington, DC]

We come here today from the four corners of this nation.

We are blacks and whites, Latinos, Asians, and Native Americans; Christians, Muslims, and Jews; gay, lesbian, and straight; immigrants and native-born Americans; rich and poor.

Here today are representatives of all sections of society: students, union members . . .

union members on strike . . .

homeless veterans . . .

and everyday warriors on the battlefield for justice.

But despite all our differences, we are here today . . . one community with one thing in common: a desire to see the restoration of the true ideals of America.

America — where fundamental rights to vote, speak, and practice religion mean something.

A country that has a democratic form of government, a democratic way of life and a nation in which all can participate freely in political activity and share in the abundance of its harvest.

But America today is still a far cry from the noble Republic founded upon those words: “All men are created equal.”

We have not dealt well with our diversity and too many of our citizens suffer needlessly.

Each day millions of Americans suffer poverty, hunger, the sting of discrimination . . .

arbitrary arrest, racial profiling, and brutality from rogue police . . .

inadequate health care, drug abuse, and unemployment.

For the millions of poor Americans, ours is not a just society.

More than 31 million Americans live in poverty. One in every six of our children live in poverty.

Some of our nation’s poor even sleep each night on the steps of the buildings just visible from the bedrooms of the White House.

And sadly, many of those who sleep on America’s streets are our veterans from US wars . . .

Sadly, nor is ours a democratic society.

In November 2000, the Republicans stole from America our most precious right of all: the right to free and fair elections.

Florida Governor Jeb Bush and his Secretary of State Katherine Harris, created a phony list of convicted felons–57,700 to be exact–to “scrub” thousands of innocent people from the state’s voter rolls. Of the thousands who ultimately lost their vote through this scrub of voters, 80% were African-American, mostly Democratic Party voters. Had they voted, the course of history would have changed. Instead, however, Harris declared Bush the victor by only 537 votes.

Now President Bush occupies the White House, but with questionable legitimacy.

But however he got there, his Administration is now free to spend one to four billion dollars a month on the war in Afghanistan . . .

free to cut the high deployment overtime pay of our young service men and women fighting in that war . . .

free to propose drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Reserve National Park . . .

free to stonewall on the Enron and Energy Task Force investigations . . .

free to revoke the rules that keep our drinking water free of arsenic . . .

free to get caught in Venezuela . . .

and free to propose laws that deny our citizens sacred freedoms cherished under the Constitution.

We must dare to remember all of this.

We must dare to debate and challenge all of this.

And that is why we are here today.

We come here today to chart a new course for our communities and for America.

To fight against bigotry, we stand together as one and we must.

To fight against injustice, we stand together as one and we must.

To fight against poverty, we stand together as one and we must.

To fight against the destruction of our environment, we stand together as one and we must.

To wage peace instead of war, we stand together as one and we must.

Because, through our efforts, I believe we can once again, make America a force for good in the world.

We, as the world’s most powerful nation have a responsibility to act in defense of the weak and to protect them from harm.

We failed in Rwanda.

We failed in Srebrenica.

We failed in East Timor.

And now, as we speak, we fail in Jenin.

Let us dedicate ourselves here today, to join together as one.

When one person stands up and speaks out for the suffering of the weak, a tiny ripple of hope is created.

When numerous people stand and demand justice for the multitude who have been forgotten, a strong current of possibilities is created.

When an entire community stands up and demands change a mighty wave of freedom and justice is created.

We gather here today and we speak with one voice . . .

And let us remember, that one person can make a ripple.

One ripple can make a movement.

One movement can make a voice.

And one voice can make mighty change.

Let us leave here today and make the change this country needs to be loved and respected around the world once again.

And remember one thing: Register and Vote!

Cynthia McKinney represents Georgia’s Fourth Congressional District. She can be reached at: cymck@mail.house.gov

More articles by:

CounterPunch Magazine

minimag-edit

bernie-the-sandernistas-cover-344x550

zen economics

Weekend Edition
May 26, 2017
Friday - Sunday
Anthony DiMaggio
Swamp Politics, Trump Style: “Russiagate” Diverts From the Real White House Scandals
Paul Street
It’s Not Gonna Be Okay: the Nauseating Nothingness of Neoliberal Capitalist and Professional Class Politics
Jeffrey St. Clair
The ICEmen Cometh
Ron Jacobs
The Deep State is the State
Pete Dolack
Why Pence Might be Even Worse Than Trump
Patrick Cockburn
We Know What Inspired the Manchester Attack, We Just Won’t Admit It
Thomas Powell
The Dirty Secret of the Korean War
Mark Ashwill
The Fat Lady Finally Sings: Bob Kerrey Quietly Resigns from Fulbright University Vietnam Leadership Position
John Davis
Beyond Hope
Uri Avnery
The Visitation: Trump in Israel
Ralph Nader
The Left/Right Challenge to the Failed “War on Drugs”
Traci Yoder
Free Speech on Campus: a Critical Analysis
Dave Lindorff
Beware the Supporter Scorned: Upstate New York Trump Voters Hit Hard in President’s Proposed 2018 Budget
Daniel Read
“Sickening Cowardice”: Now More Than Ever, Britain’s Theresa May Must be Held to Account on the Plight of Yemen’s Children
Ana Portnoy
Before the Gates: Puerto Rico’s First Bankruptcy Trial
M. Reza Behnam
Rethinking Iran’s Terrorism Designation
Brian Cloughley
Ukraine and the NATO Military Alliance
Josh Hoxie
Pain as a Policy Choice
David Macaray
Stephen Hawking Needs to Keep His Mouth Shut
Ramzy Baroud
Fear as an Obstacle to Peace: Why Are Israelis So Afraid?
Kathleen Wallace
The Bilious Incongruity of Trump’s Toilet
Seth Sandronsky
Temping Now
Alan Barber – Dean Baker
Blue Collar Blues: Manufacturing Falls in Indiana, Ohio and Pennsylvania in April
Jill Richardson
Saving America’s Great Places
Richard Lawless
Are Credit Rating Agencies America’s Secret Fifth Column?
Louis Proyect
Venezuela Reconsidered
Murray Dobbin
The NDP’s Singh and Ashton: Flash Versus Vision
Ron Leighton
Endarkenment: Postmodernism, Identity Politics, and the Attack on Free Speech
Anthony Papa
Drug War Victim: Oklahoma’s Larry Yarbrough to be Freed after 23 Years in Prison
Rev. John Dear
A Call to Mobilize the Nation Over the Next 18 Months
Yves Engler
Why Anti-Zionism and Anti-Jewish Prejudice Have to Do With Each Other
Ish Mishra
Political Underworld and Adventure Journalism
Binoy Kampmark
Roger Moore in Bondage
Rob Seimetz
Measuring Manhoods
Edward Curtin
Sorry, You’re Not Invited
Vern Loomis
Winning the Lottery is a State of Mind
Charles R. Larson
Review: Mary V. Dearborn’s “Ernest Hemingway”
David Yearsley
The Ethos of Mayfest
May 25, 2017
Jennifer Matsui
The Rise of the Alt-Center
Michael Hudson
Another Housing Bubble?
Robert Fisk
Trump Meets the New Leader of the Secular World, Pope Francis
John Laforge
Draft Treaty Banning Nuclear Weapons Unveiled
Benjamin Dangl
Trump’s Budget Expands War on the Backs of America’s Poor
Alice Donovan
US-Led Air Strikes Killed Record Number of Civilians in Syria
Andrew Moss
The Meaning of Trump’s Wall
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail