Annual Fundraising Appeal
Over the course of 21 years, we’ve published many unflattering stories about Henry Kissinger. We’ve recounted his involvement in the Chilean coup and the illegal bombings of Cambodia and Laos; his hidden role in the Kent State massacre and the genocide in East Timor; his noxious influence peddling in DC and craven work for dictators and repressive regimes around the world. We’ve questioned his ethics, his morals and his intelligence. We’ve called for him to be arrested and tried for war crimes. But nothing we’ve ever published pissed off HK quite like this sequence of photos taken at a conference in Brazil, which appeared in one of the early print editions of CounterPunch.
100716HenryKissingerNosePicking
The publication of those photos, and the story that went with them, 20 years ago earned CounterPunch a global audience in the pre-web days and helped make our reputation as a fearless journal willing to take the fight to the forces of darkness without flinching. Now our future is entirely in your hands. Please donate.

Day11

Yes, these are dire political times. Many who optimistically hoped for real change have spent nearly five years under the cold downpour of political reality. Here at CounterPunch we’ve always aimed to tell it like it is, without illusions or despair. That’s why so many of you have found a refuge at CounterPunch and made us your homepage. You tell us that you love CounterPunch because the quality of the writing you find here in the original articles we offer every day and because we never flinch under fire. We appreciate the support and are prepared for the fierce battles to come.

Unlike other outfits, we don’t hit you up for money every month … or even every quarter. We ask only once a year. But when we ask, we mean it.

CounterPunch’s website is supported almost entirely by subscribers to the print edition of our magazine. We aren’t on the receiving end of six-figure grants from big foundations. George Soros doesn’t have us on retainer. We don’t sell tickets on cruise liners. We don’t clog our site with deceptive corporate ads.

The continued existence of CounterPunch depends solely on the support and dedication of our readers. We know there are a lot of you. We get thousands of emails from you every day. Our website receives millions of hits and nearly 100,000 readers each day. And we don’t charge you a dime.

Please, use our brand new secure shopping cart to make a tax-deductible donation to CounterPunch today or purchase a subscription our monthly magazine and a gift sub for someone or one of our explosive  books, including the ground-breaking Killing Trayvons. Show a little affection for subversion: consider an automated monthly donation. (We accept checks, credit cards, PayPal and cold-hard cash….)
cp-store

or use
pp1

To contribute by phone you can call Becky or Deva toll free at: 1-800-840-3683

Thank you for your support,

Jeffrey, Joshua, Becky, Deva, and Nathaniel

CounterPunch
 PO Box 228, Petrolia, CA 95558

It turns out that Linda Lay’s weepy interview with Lisa Meyers of NBC News this week was as phony as an Enron stock prospectus. The tears shed by Lay’s latest trophy wife were scripted by public relations mavens from the powerhouse firm Hill and Knowlton. Kenneth Lay’s sister, Sharon, told the Houston Chronicle on Wednesday, […]

Tears of a Clown

by Jeffrey St. Clair

It turns out that Linda Lay’s weepy interview with Lisa Meyers of NBC News this week was as phony as an Enron stock prospectus. The tears shed by Lay’s latest trophy wife were scripted by public relations mavens from the powerhouse firm Hill and Knowlton.

Kenneth Lay’s sister, Sharon, told the Houston Chronicle on Wednesday, that she sent out a distress call last week to her friend, M.A. Shute, an executive for the public relations firm Hill & Knowlton who had represented Enron. When she called, Shute was sailing in the Caribbean with her husband.

“Get back here right now,” Sharon Lay demanded. “We need your help!”

Hill and Knowlton is to corporate damage control what Arthur Andersen is to the financial books of an ailing company, a sleight of hand artist. Hill and Knowlton has transformed the leaders of Latin American death squads into agents of altruism, tobacco pushers into health nuts, toxic waste generators into saviors of the wilderness.

“We wanted M.A. to give us some suggestions and insight as to how to handle all of this,” Sharon Lay said. The Lay’s were piqued that the press and the nasty Rep. Henry Waxman were constantly deploying words such as “arrogance” and “greed” to describe top Enron executives. “These words would never have come to mind in describing my family,” Sharon Lay said.

Of course, Ken Lay can’t talk. His lawyers have told him that anything he says will be used against him in court. So he sent his family forth to defend him. That’s where Hill and Knowlton’s Shute came into play.

Shute moved into Sharon Lay’s Houston home and spent a furious week coaching Sharon and Linda and the rest of the Lay brood on how to present themselves to the media. Then it was off to the Today show, the executive class’s Oprah.

Before Lisa Meyers, Linda Lay depicted herself as distraught and busted, a lonely housewife whose membership in the local Houston country clubs might be endangered by the calamitous downturn in her husband’s financial prospects. Her husband Kenny Boy, according to Linda Lay, was as much a victim as lowliest Enron wage earner whose pension had dissolved into thin air. He had done no wrong. Instead, wrong had been done unto him. His company had been sabotaged by evil advisors. “He didn’t know what was going on,” she said.

Now the Lays face poverty and deserve pity, not jail time. “We’re broke,” Linda moaned. “We’re selling everything we own.” The tears streamed. Even Lisa Meyers’ eyes seemed to mist over at the tragic narrative of the Lay’s reversal of fortune.

Too bad the account appears to be a nicely packaged tissue of lies. According to a review of the Lay’s real estate holdings in the Houston metro area, they still own over a dozen properties valued at more than $10 million. None of them are on the market. Then there’s that $14 million “vacation” home in Aspen.

Welcome to hard times, Linda and Ken.