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HOW MODERN MONEY WORKS — Economist Alan Nasser presents a slashing indictment of the vicious nature of finance capitalism; The Bio-Social Facts of American Capitalism: David Price excavates the racist anthropology of Earnest Hooten and his government allies; Is Zero-Tolerance Policing Worth More Chokehold Deaths? Martha Rosenberg and Robert Wilbur assay the deadly legacy of the Broken Windows theory of criminology; Gaming the White Man’s Money: Louis Proyect offers a short history of tribal casinos; Death by Incarceration: Troy Thomas reports from inside prison on the cruelty of life without parole sentences. Plus: Jeffrey St. Clair on how the murder of Michael Brown got lost in the media coverage; JoAnn Wypijewski on class warfare from Martinsburg to Ferguson; Mike Whitney on the coming stock market crash; Chris Floyd on DC’s Insane Clown Posse; Lee Ballinger on the warped nostalgia for the Alamo; and Nathaniel St. Clair on “Boyhood.”
The singer is Big Maybelle; the man in the sparkly suit, Rufus Thomas. The place: a jook joint somewhere around Memphis. The photographer: Ernest C. Withers. Big Maybelle had a hit with “Gabbin Blues” in 1953, around when this picture was made. Thomas was a DJ on the all-black WDIA radio station in Memphis and […]

The Memphis Blues Again

by Daniel Wolff

The singer is Big Maybelle; the man in the sparkly suit, Rufus Thomas. The place: a jook joint somewhere around Memphis. The photographer: Ernest C. Withers. Big Maybelle had a hit with “Gabbin Blues” in 1953, around when this picture was made. Thomas was a DJ on the all-black WDIA radio station in Memphis and was cutting “Bear Cat” over at Sun Records with Sam Phillips. He’d go on to do “The Funky Chicken” at Stax.

Withers was (and still is) a commercial photographer on Beale Street who covered segregated Memphis. He took pictures of all the r&b stars from a young Aretha Franklin cozying up to Sam Cooke to Muddy Water congratulating a local Little League team to Marvin Gaye hiding behind security.

Withers’ music photographs have just come out in a new book: The Memphis Blues Again: Six Decades of Memphis Music Photographs. Selected, identified, and with an introduction by Daniel Wolff.

“I am a photographer, and when you’re a photographer, you make a shining light of an image.” Ernest C. Withers