Annual Fundraising Appeal
Over the course of 21 years, we’ve published many unflattering stories about Henry Kissinger. We’ve recounted his involvement in the Chilean coup and the illegal bombings of Cambodia and Laos; his hidden role in the Kent State massacre and the genocide in East Timor; his noxious influence peddling in DC and craven work for dictators and repressive regimes around the world. We’ve questioned his ethics, his morals and his intelligence. We’ve called for him to be arrested and tried for war crimes. But nothing we’ve ever published pissed off HK quite like this sequence of photos taken at a conference in Brazil, which appeared in one of the early print editions of CounterPunch.
100716HenryKissingerNosePicking
The publication of those photos, and the story that went with them, 20 years ago earned CounterPunch a global audience in the pre-web days and helped make our reputation as a fearless journal willing to take the fight to the forces of darkness without flinching. Now our future is entirely in your hands. Please donate.

Day12Fixed

Yes, these are dire political times. Many who optimistically hoped for real change have spent nearly five years under the cold downpour of political reality. Here at CounterPunch we’ve always aimed to tell it like it is, without illusions or despair. That’s why so many of you have found a refuge at CounterPunch and made us your homepage. You tell us that you love CounterPunch because the quality of the writing you find here in the original articles we offer every day and because we never flinch under fire. We appreciate the support and are prepared for the fierce battles to come.

Unlike other outfits, we don’t hit you up for money every month … or even every quarter. We ask only once a year. But when we ask, we mean it.

CounterPunch’s website is supported almost entirely by subscribers to the print edition of our magazine. We aren’t on the receiving end of six-figure grants from big foundations. George Soros doesn’t have us on retainer. We don’t sell tickets on cruise liners. We don’t clog our site with deceptive corporate ads.

The continued existence of CounterPunch depends solely on the support and dedication of our readers. We know there are a lot of you. We get thousands of emails from you every day. Our website receives millions of hits and nearly 100,000 readers each day. And we don’t charge you a dime.

Please, use our brand new secure shopping cart to make a tax-deductible donation to CounterPunch today or purchase a subscription our monthly magazine and a gift sub for someone or one of our explosive  books, including the ground-breaking Killing Trayvons. Show a little affection for subversion: consider an automated monthly donation. (We accept checks, credit cards, PayPal and cold-hard cash….)
cp-store

or use
pp1

To contribute by phone you can call Becky or Deva toll free at: 1-800-840-3683

Thank you for your support,

Jeffrey, Joshua, Becky, Deva, and Nathaniel

CounterPunch
 PO Box 228, Petrolia, CA 95558

Before Sept. 11 Ailing Cheney Told Bush He Would Quit Soon

Ridge Scheduled As New Veep

by Alexander Cockburn And Jeffrey St. Clair

Before the September 11 attacks, vice president Dick Cheney was set to quit. President George Bush was preparing to nominate Pennsylvania governor Tom Ridge as Cheney’s successor.

A prominent Philadelphia businessman and close friend of Pennsylvania governor Tom Ridge has been telling friends that in late summer Cheney went to Bush and told the president that his health was so precarious that he would soon be forced to quit the vice presidential post. Bush had thereupon called the Pennsylvania governor and told him that when Cheney stepped down he wanted to nominate Ridge to the US Senate for confirmation as the new vice president.

With a medical history of four heart attacks since 1978, and a bypass in 1988, Cheney’s condition has been a subject of concern ever since Bush put him forward as his vice presidential nominee at the Republican convention in Philadelphia in July, 2000. Cheney’s health once again hit the headlines in January of this year when he was forced into surgery for an angioplasty amid the stresses of the Florida recount at the start of this year. Cheney had another “mild” heart in March and again went under the surgeon’s knife.

It’s no surprise that Bush called Ridge. Before he himself became the nominee Cheney had been supervising the search for Bush’s running mate and put Ridge at the top of the list. But Ridge is pro-choice and the fury of the Republican right forced Bush to abandon the plan. Even so, in recent months there’s been widespread speculation that Cheney would stand down in 2004, with Ridge as his designated successor. When Cheney was in hospital for surgery after his last heart attack, Ridge was summoned to Camp David, where he appeared at a press conference standing behind Bush.

Cheney’s decision to quit lends another level of drama to the morning of September 11, when a vice president with a weakening heart was running the country while the President was heading for the SAC deep shelters in Nebraska.

On September 12, amid widespread public dismay at Bush’s disappearing act on a day of dreadful national crisis, the White House concocted the story, later reiterated by Cheney, that there had “credible threat” of a plan to attack Air Force One, thus justifying Bush’s zig-zag, belated return to Washington. The White House told New York Times columnist William Safire that after the onslaughts of the World Trade Center and the Pentagon a terrorist phone call “using code words” had said Air Force One was a target. Safire leaped to the astounding conclusion that there was a bin Laden mole in the White House. Two weeks later, on September 25, CBS News reported that there had been no such phone call.

In a Meet the Press interview with ABC’s Tim Russert on September 16 Cheney laid great stress on succession as having been very much on his mind in those frantic morning hours of September 11. Four days later Bush told the joint session of Congress he was nominating Tom Ridge as head of the new Office of Homeland Security, thus setting Ridge on the national stage. CP