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The “Peace” Agreement

by Alexander Cockburn And Jeffrey St. Clair

The text was in Serbian and translated by
AP:

“In order to move forward toward solving
the Kosovo crisis, an agreement should be reached on the following
principles:

“1: Imminent and verifiable end to violence
and repression of Kosovo.

“2. Verifiable withdrawal from Kosovo of
military, police and paramilitary forces according to a quick
timetable.

“3. Deployment in Kosovo, under U.N. auspicies,
of efficient international civilian and security presences which
would act as can be decided according to Chapter 7 of the U.N.
Charter and be capable of guaranteeing fulfillment of joint goals.

“4. International security presence, with
an essential NATO participation, must be deployed under a unified
control and command and authorized to secure safe environment
for all the residents in Kosovo and enable the safe return of
the displaced persons and refugees to their homes.

“5. Establishment of an interim administration
for Kosovo …which the U.N. Security Council will decide and
under which the people of Kosovo will enjoy substantial autonomy
within the Federal Republic of >Yugoslavia . The interim administration
(will) secure transitional authority during the time (for the)
interim democratic and self-governing institutions, (establish)
conditions for peaceful and normal life of all citizens of Kosovo.

“6. After the withdrawal, an agreed number
of Serb personnel will be allowed to return to perform the following
duties:    liaison with the international civilian
mission and international security presence, marking mine fields,
maintaining a presence at places of Serb heritage, maintaining
a presence at key border crossings.

“7. Safe and free return of all refugees
and the displaced under the supervision of UNHCR and undisturbed
access for humanitarian organizations to Kosovo.

“8. Political process directed at reaching
interim political agreement which would secure essential autonomy
for Kosovo, with full taking into consideration of the Rambouillet
agreement, the principles of sovereignty and territorial integrity
of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and other states in the
region as well as demilitarization of the Kosovo Liberation Army.
The talks between the sides about the solution should not delay
or disrupt establishment of the democratic self-governning institutions.

“9. General approach to the economic development
of the crisis region. That would include carrying out a pact
of stability for southeastern Europe, wide international participation
in order to advance democracy and economic prosperity, and stability
and regional cooperation.

“10. The end of military activities will
depend on acceptance of the listed principles and simultaneous
agreement with other previously identified elements which are
identified in the footnote below. Then a military-technical agreement
will be agreed which will among other things specify additional
modalities, including the role and function of the Yugoslav,
i.e. Serb, personnel in Kosovo.

“11. The process of withdrawal includes a
phased, detailed timetable and the marking of a buffer zone in
Serbia behind which the troops will withdraw.

“12. The returning personnel: The equipment
of the returning personnel, the range of their functional responsibilities,
the timetable for their return, determination of the geographic
zones of their activity, the rules guiding their relations with
the international security presence and the international civilian
mission.

“Footnote. Other required elements: Fast
and precise timetable for the withdrawal which means for instance:
seven days to end the withdrawal; pulling out of weapons of air
defense from the zone of the mutual security of 25 kilometers
within 48 hours; return of the personnel to fullfill the four
duties will be carried out under the supervision of >the international
security presence and will be limited to a small agreed number
— hundreds,not thousands.

“Suspension of military actions will happen
after the beginning of the withdrawal which can be verified.
Discussion about the military-technical agreement and its reaching
will not prolong the agreed period for the withdrawal.”

Jeffrey St. Clair is editor of CounterPunch. His new book is Killing Trayvons: an Anthology of American Violence (with JoAnn Wypijewski and Kevin Alexander Gray). He can be reached at: sitka@comcast.net. Alexander Cockburn’s Guillotined! and A Colossal Wreck are available from CounterPunch.

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