This Week on CounterPunch Radio
LAURA CARLSEN

  • HOST: Eric Draitsercpradio-podcast
  • GUEST: Laura Carlsen
  • TOPICS: US strategic objectives in Latin America and economic contradictions in the US-Mexico relationship.

Slandering Populism: a Chilling Media Habit

I imagine I’m not the only political and media observer sickened by the dominant (“mainstream”) corporate media’s habitual reference to xenophobic, right-wing, white-nationalist, and neo-fascist politicians like Donald Trump, Geert Wilders, Nigel Farage, and Marine Le Pen as “populists.” Populism properly understood is about popular and democratic opposition to the rule of the money power – to the reign of concentrated wealth. It emerged from radical farmers’ fight for social and economic justice and democracy against the plutocracy of the nation’s Robber Baron capitalists during the late 19th century. It was a movement of the left. More

Mountain of Tears: the Vanishing Glaciers of the Pacific Northwest

I’ve made this same climb up the rugged northeastern slope of Mt. Hood every year since we moved to Oregon. This is expedition 26. The route is challenging to the point of being cruel. It’s even more demanding on an aging body that has spent far too many years bent over a Macintosh.

The trail up Cooper’s Spur, a sharp ridge plunging off the volcano’s pyramidal peak, is steep and treacherous. The slope is coated in fine steel-gray volcanic ash, ground down over the centuries by snow and ice. You take two steps up and slide one step back. The trail zigzags its way ever-upwards, gaining more than 3,000 feet, in dozens of switchbacks through ash and scree to a place called Hieroglyph Point, where the path finally peters out. According to mountain lore, Hieroglyph Point was named after a boulder featuring “mysterious markings.” In fact, the markings aren’t mysterious and they aren’t hieroglyphics. They are beautiful kanji characters carved into the rock by Japanese climbers who summited Hood via this precarious route in 1908. This is the highest spot on the mountain that you can reach by trail. But having reached 9,000 feet, I usually scramble even further up the 45-degree slope to the Chimney, a near vertical passage through dark basalt to the summit. More

The Neoliberal or the Fascist? What Should French Progressives Do?

The presidential runoff between Emmanuel Macron and Marine le Pen poses a dilemma for many French progressive voters: the former is seen as one of the main architects of François Hollande’s most unpopular pro-market and antisocial reforms, such as the Labour Law which dismantled vital workers’ rights. If elected, he promises a hardened version of those reforms, which have destroyed the Socialist Party. The latter, no less neoliberal than Macron (she has a similar socio-economic platform to Donald Trump), proposes an authoritarian regime in which the old obsessions of French Fascism could thrive: bashing Muslims, anti-immigration, as well as curbing civil liberties. More

Exclusively in the New Print Issue of CounterPunch

The Coming War on Iran
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In this issue: Dan Glazebrook explains why Trump’s alliance with Russia may increase the odds of a war on Iran. The End of Diplomacy? Former CIA analyst Mel Goodman provides a field guide to Trump’s cabinet. Fukushima, Still Melting: John LaForge on the 6-year long crisis at the ruined Fukushima nuclear site; Refugees vs. Climate Change: Ben Debney on real and manufactured crises. The New Latin American Feminism by Laura Carlsen. The ICEmen Cometh by Jeffrey St. Clair. Organizing on the Border by Kent Paterson. Inside Steve Bannon’s Brain by Chris Floyd. What Does the Left Want? by Yvette Carnell. Catalonia Rising by Daniel Raventos and Julie Wark. Who Profits From Rate-Tweaking? by Mike Whitney. From Sea to Dying Sea by Lee Ballinger. Breakdown at the Oscars by Ed Leer.

Dutch Arms Dealer Who Fueled Liberian Civil War Convicted

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